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Articles on Antimicrobial resistance

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Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria (coloured yellow) enmeshed within a human white blood cell (coloured red). MRSA is a major cause of hospital-associated infections. (NIAID)

Drug-resistant superbugs: A global threat intensified by the fight against coronavirus

Antimicrobial resistance is a public health and economic disaster waiting to happen. If we do not address this threat, by 2050 more people will die from drug-resistant infections than from cancer.
Rates of resistance to the bacteria commonly known as golden staph are at least double in remote Indigenous communities what they are in Australia’s major cities. Lucy Hughes Jones/AAP

Antibiotic resistance is an even greater challenge in remote Indigenous communities

Antibiotic resistance is one of the greatest health challenges of the modern day. It's especially prevalent, and must be acted on, in Australia's remote Indigenous communities.
More stringent use of antibiotics is needed to curb antibiotic resistance. But how can we achieve this? From shutterstock.com

We can reverse antibiotic resistance in Australia. Here’s how Sweden is doing it

Antibiotic resistance is one of the greatest health challenges we face today. But making a few small changes to the way antibiotics are prescribed could make a big difference in Australia.
Our research showed that inflight magazines offered travellers health advice on everything from dehydration to swollen ankles, but hardly anything on avoiding catching and spreading infectious diseases. from www.shutterstock.com

Air travel spreads infections globally, but health advice from inflight magazines can limit that

Washing hands and coughing into your elbow can help limit the spread of infectious diseases on planes and around the globe. So why don't passengers read about this in their inflight magazines?
Paramedics bury a man who died of the Nipah virus in Kozhikode, southern India, in May 2018. There is no vaccine for the virus, which can cause raging fevers, convulsions and vomiting, and kills up to 75 per cent of people infected. (AP Photo/K.Shijith)

‘One Health’ keeps humans one step ahead of the microbes

As new viruses "jump" from wildlife to humans and we struggle with antimicrobial resistance and even climate change, a new interdisciplinary approach to human health might just save the day.

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