Articles on Child care

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Paternity leave can increase fathers’ involvement in families, with positive impacts on children, fathers and the co-parent. (Shutterstock)

Father’s Day: Involved dads are healthier and happier

Our children can't continue to grow up in a world where only women raise them, either at home or in early care and learning.
Reducing the number of child care subsidies will mean that some parents will not be able to support their families or continue their studies. (Shutterstock)

Ontario’s child-care cuts will hurt low-income parents working or studying full time

For better childhood developmental outcomes and better economics, and in the absence of other long-recommended child care policies, the child care subsidy system should be expanded, not cut.
From multiple points of view, the proposed tax-rebate child care plan does not add up. (Shutterstock)

Why an Ontario tax credit for child care is a bad idea

An economist who researched and recommended free preschool child care in Ontario says there are multiple reasons why the province's anticipated child care plan, based on tax credits, is flawed.
A new bill to provide affordable child care for working families faces an uphill battle in Congress. Rawpixel from www.shutterstock.com

Why Congress needs to make child care more affordable – 5 questions answered

Working class families have struggled for years to afford quality child care. Could the newly proposed Child Care for Working Families Act make a difference? A child care policy scholar weighs in.
Children can get quite expensive. silentalex88/Shutterstock.com

The soaring cost of US child care, in 5 charts

Sen. Warren is proposing universal child care as a way to rein in the soaring costs of raising a family. A sociologist explains what’s driving the trend.
Family day care workers provide this essential service from their homes, but being classed as independent contractors means they lack many employment protections. AFIMSC

Childcare shake-up neglects family day care workers, but we can learn from garment workers’ experience

Family day care workers have much in common with home-based workers in the garment industry. But the latter are classed as employees, resulting in better representation and protected work conditions.
A mother in a low-income family can lose 85-95% of her earnings from working more days to income tax, loss of benefits and childcare costs. riopatuca/Shutterstock

Mothers have little to show for extra days of work under new tax changes

An 85-95% effective marginal tax rate means the second earner in a low-income family can increase from two days' work a week to three, four or five days and be better off by only about $4,000 a year.

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