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Articles on Cuba

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A caution sign marks the Hanford Nuclear Reservation near Richland, Wash., where plutonium for nuclear weapons was made. Jeff T. Green/Getty Images

Russia is sparking new nuclear threats – understanding nonproliferation history helps place this in context

Despite decades of progress on nonproliferation, Russia’s new threats of nuclear strikes bring to mind that convincing countries to reduce their nuclear weapons has long been very difficult.
A ground crew member directs the loading of a shipment of Cuba’s homegrown COVID-19 vaccines donated to Syria, on the tarmac of the Jose Marti International Airport, in Havana, on Jan. 7, 2022. (AP Photo / Ramon Espinosa)

Big Pharma vs. Little Cuba: Why Cubans trust vaccines and how they’re helping vaccinate the world

Cuba is acting on the scientific fact that humanity will be safest when all who can be vaccinated are vaccinated. It is following the science and earning its trusted reputation.
Women look at a screen displaying exchange rate at a currency exchange office in St. Petersburg, Russia. The Russian currency has plunged against the U.S. dollar after the West imposed severe economic sanctions. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Ukraine invasion: Why Canada should rethink its approach to economic sanctions

Some economic sanctions may violate international law principles, including those the sanctions are intended to enforce. They may therefore undermine the very legal regimes Canadians champion.
A military vehicle destroyed on Feb. 18, 2022, by an explosion in Donetsk, a city in eastern Ukraine controlled by Russian separatists. Nikolai Trishin\TASS via Getty Images

What are false flag attacks – and did Russia stage any to claim justification for invading Ukraine?

Attacking your own side and blaming your foe has a long history and a firm grip on the popular imagination. But the internet makes it difficult to pull off – and less desirable.
The Russian and Ukrainian governments both blamed forces aligned with the other for mortar fire in eastern Ukraine and for using the accusations as justification for increased aggression. AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda

What are false flag attacks – and could Russia make one work in the information age?

Attacking your own side and blaming your foe has a long history and a firm grip on the popular imagination. But the internet makes it difficult to pull off – and less desirable.
Builders construct experimental vaults of brick and cement blocks in Santiago de Cuba in December 1960. Centro de Documentación, Empresa RESTAURA, Oficina del Historiador de la Ciudad de La Habana

Cuba’s post-revolution architecture offers a blueprint for how to build more with less

After Fidel Castro took power, government plans to build new housing, schools and factories were hindered by sanctions and supply chain issues, forcing architects to come up with creative solutions.
Canadian David Card, winner of the 2021 Nobel Prize in economics, stands for a portrait in Berkeley, Calif. Card, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, received the award for his research on minimum wages and immigration. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Nobel winner David Card shows immigrants don’t reduce the wages of native-born workers

Canadian economist David Card won the Nobel Prize in economics for demonstrating that large-scale immigration has no effect on the wages of native-born workers. In doing so, he’s challenged Economics 101.
In late 2016, people working and living in the embassy district of Havana, including at the U.S. Embassy seen here, began hearing strange sounds before getting sick. AP Photo/Desmond Boylan

Havana syndrome fits the pattern of psychosomatic illness – but that doesn’t mean the symptoms aren’t real

Havana syndrome has spread to government officials around the world and stumped doctors for years. Despite news of mysterious attacks, evidence suggests mass psychogenic illness may be the true cause.

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