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Articles on Dingoes

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Australia is home to many new species, including wild camels found nowhere else on Earth.

Non-native species should count in conservation – even in Australia

Species counts drive conservation science and policy, yet a major component of biodiversity is excluded from the data: non-native species.
One in four of nearly 800 animals genetically tested were pure dingo. Michelle J Photography

Dingoes found in New South Wales, but we’re killing them as ‘wild dogs’

There is a myth that dingoes are extinct and wild dogs are all that remain in Australia. Our results show dingoes in New South Wales persist despite some mixing with domestic dogs.
An example of a typical dingo. Photograph depicts a male from K’gari-Fraser Island (Queensland). John Williams

The dingo is a true-blue, native Australian species

Of all Australia’s wildlife, one stands out as having an identity crisis: the dingo. New research has found the dingo is its own species, distinct from ‘wild dogs’.
Eastern quolls have been introduced in Booderee Nation Park as part of a rewilding project. Oisin Sweeney

We can ‘rewild’ swathes of Australia by focusing on what makes it unique

Rewilding is gaining popularity around the world, as a means to restore ecosystems to their ancient state. But just like Vegemite, Australian rewilding projects need to have a unique flavour.
Colonial graziers found it more effective to poison dingoes than rely on convict shepherds to protect their flocks. Justine Philip/AMMRIC 2017

How Australia made poisoning animals normal

As soon as white colonists began farming sheep in Australia, they looked for a way to eradicate dingoes.
The dingo, Australia’s largest mammalian carnivore, has a broad diet that varies across the continent. Judy Dunlop

Dingo dinners: what’s on the menu for Australia’s top predator?

A survey of 32,000 samples of dingo droppings and stomach contents reveal that this predator’s appetite is as wide-ranging as Australia’s landscapes. But medium and large mammals are top of the menu.
Dingoes are usually solitary, but can forage in groups near human settlements where food is abundant. Klaasmer/Wikimedia Commons

Why do dingoes attack people, and how can we prevent it?

An attack on a WA mine worker has highlighted the danger of wild dingoes, particularly when attracted by humans’ food - one of the factors that can make an attack by wild predators much more likely.

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