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Articles on Gene editing

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American biochemist Jennifer A. Doudna, left, and French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier were awarded this year’s Nobel Prize for chemistry. Alexander Heinl/picture alliance via Getty Images

Nobel Prize for chemistry honors exquisitely precise gene-editing technique, CRISPR – a gene engineer explains how it works

The tools to rewrite the genetic code to improve crops and livestock, or to treat genetic diseases, has revolutionized biology. A CRISPR engineer explains why this technology won the Nobel, and its potential.
A researcher performs a CRISPR/Cas9 process at the Max-Delbrueck-Centre for Molecular Medicine in Germany . Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images

COVID-19 and gene editing: ethical and legal considerations

One of the methods researchers are exploring to combat COVID-19 is gene editing: altering the genome of the virus to make it harmless.
The team used CRISPR on human embryos in a bid to render them resistant to HIV infection. But instead, they generated different mutations, about which we know nothing. SHUTTERSTOCK

China’s failed gene-edited baby experiment proves we’re not ready for human embryo modification

A number of things may have gone wrong when researchers edited Chinese twins Lulu and Nana's genome. Either way, the failed experiment is a cautionary tale for us all.
Scientists are using gene editing to make better cancer treatments. Lightspring/Shutterstock.com

How gene-edited white blood cells are helping fight cancer

In a new study, a team of US scientists have used gene editing to change the genetic code of white blood cells and transform them into more efficient tumor fighting cells. How did they do it?
CRISPR has many applications, including targeted gene therapy, but the precision of the technology still has a way to go. Shutterstock

Gene editing needs to become more precise to live up to its promise

CRISPR technology is continually improving to make it more specific, but serious consideration should be given to when and how CRISPR is safe for gene editing.
When it comes to reproduction, couple have more choices than ever before. Chinnapong/Shutterstock.com

What the ban on gene-edited babies means for family planning

A ban on clinical trials involving gene editing rules out the controversial procedure done in China. But it also prevents procedures that could offer couples a chance for healthy children without genetic disorders.
What’s the best way to put the brakes on current research? Okrasyuk/Shutterstock.com

A case against a moratorium on germline gene editing

Scientists and ethicists have called for a five-year moratorium on editing human genes that will pass on to future generations. Yes, society needs to figure out how to proceed – but is this the best way?
Experts have called for a moratorium on clinical research with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. of the germline — that is changing heritable DNA in sperm, eggs or embryos to make genetically modified children. (Shutterstock)

CRISPR gene editing: Why we need Slow Science

CRISPR gene editing should learn from the Slow Food movement. Scientists must allow time for critical conversations and perfecting of techniques before rewriting the source code of humanity.

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