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Articles on Geoengineering

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Some areas wouldn’t see immediate effects, and there could be serious consequences. Buda Mendes/Getty Images

Solar geoengineering might work, but local temperatures could keep rising for years

Injecting reflective particles into the atmosphere won’t immediately cool the entire planet. A new study shows how parts of the US, China and Europe might still see temperatures rising a decade later.
This direct air capture plant in Iceland was designed to capture 4,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year. Climeworks 2021 via AP Photos

How not to solve the climate change problem

A climate scientist looks at what works and some popular ideas that aren’t as cheap or effective as people hope.
Salvatore Allegra / AP

How plate tectonics, mountains and deep-sea sediments have maintained Earth’s ‘Goldilocks’ climate

New modelling shows how tectonic plate movements, carbon-rich deep-sea sediment, and mountain weathering have regulated Earth’s climate.
If successful, solar geoengineering would would reduce the amount of sunlight that reaches the Earth’s surface and warms the planet. (Shutterstock)

Solar geoengineering could limit global warming, but Canada should study risks and benefits first

Solar geoengineering could theoretically cool the Earth to slow global warming, and it has been controversial. Still, countries should research its risks and benefits.
Trapping carbon dioxide in minerals happens naturally over thousands of years. Can humans speed it up – safely? Simon Clancy

Can we tweak marine chemistry to help stave off climate change?

Adding industrial chemicals and natural alkaline minerals could slow climate change, but like other geoengineering proposals, it comes with many complex technical and legal challenges.

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