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Articles on Mental health

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People with mental illness face stigmatization because of three things: the creation of stereotypes, the internalization of prejudices and acts of discrimination. (Shutterstock)

We still stigmatize mental illness, and that needs to stop

In any given year, one in five people in Canada will personally experience a mental health problem or illness. Despite this number there’s still massive stigmatization.
South Asians in Canada have reported some of the highest mental health issues this year. Listen to our podcast where we discuss the challenges associated with the pressure of being a ‘model minority.’ (Shutterstock)

How mental health issues get stigmatized in South Asian communities: Culturally diverse therapy needed

Recently, Statistics Canada revealed that South Asians have reported lower levels of mental health than any other Canadians during the pandemic: a neuropsychology student explains some of the reasons.
On Don’t Call Me Resilient, we speak with Satwinder Bains, associate professor and director of the South Asian Studies Institute at the University of the Fraser Valley and Maneet Chahal, co-founder of Soch Mental Health. (Claudia Wolff)

Model minority blues — The mental health consequences of being a model citizen: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 9 transcript

Recently, Statistics Canada revealed that South Asians reported lower levels of mental health than any other Canadians during the pandemic.
In this episode, we discuss some of the reasons South Asians are reporting higher rates of mental health issues than any other group. Here a group of young South Asians at Besharam, a Toronto nightclub hosted by DJ Amita (pre-pandemic). courtesy Besharam

Model minority blues: The mental health consequences of being a model citizen — Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 9

The pressure of needing to be a model minority — successful, quiet, hardworking — can force people to internalize their mental anguish and ends up leaving gaps in our mental health services.
Although some youth are clearly reporting a negative effect on their social, personal and educational lives during the pandemic, the majority are responding to COVID-19 in ways that are developmentally and psychologically normal. (Canva)

Not as good as we want, not as bad as we’ve heard: Teen mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic

Is there a mental health crisis among young people, or are worry and sadness to be expected? Pathologizing normal, healthy responses to adverse events promotes misunderstanding about mental illness.
Physical activity, eating habits and emotional support from friends and family are stronger predictors of health than body mass index. Keith Bedford/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

If you want to support the health and wellness of kids, stop focusing on their weight

Weight discrimination, like teasing, is common among youth and linked to eating disorders and depression. Youth’s health and well-being would be best supported by not focusing on their weight.
Family members often take on the burden of preparing and delivering meals to their relatives. SoumenNath/E+ via Getty Images

What’s on the menu matters in health care for diverse patients

Some older patients forego the food provided at their health care facility because it isn’t aligned with their religious and cultural preferences.
Vulnerability to suicide may build up throughout the course of life, and may start with events occurring in the perinatal period and infancy. (Shutterstock)

Understanding the early-life origins of suicide: Vulnerability may begin even before birth

Early life influences have been linked to higher risk of suicide later in life. Reducing those risks, and boosting resilience in children exposed to them, may help reduce suicide rates.

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