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Articles on Ocean acidification

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If successful, solar geoengineering would would reduce the amount of sunlight that reaches the Earth’s surface and warms the planet. (Shutterstock)

Solar geoengineering could limit global warming, but Canada should study risks and benefits first

Solar geoengineering could theoretically cool the Earth to slow global warming, and it has been controversial. Still, countries should research its risks and benefits.
Blue sharks, which are prized for their fins, swimming off Cape Point in South Africa. Morne Hardenberg

South Africa’s plan to protect sharks needs an urgent update

Sharks grow slowly and produce few young compared to bony fishes. In many cases, this means that their populations are fished out faster than can be replenished if not well managed.
Morgan Pratchett, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

The outlook for coral reefs remains grim unless we cut emissions fast — new research

A study of 183 coral reefs worldwide quantified the impacts of ocean warming and acidification on reef growth rates. Even under the lowest emissions scenarios, the future of reefs is not bright.
In August 2019 in the port of Marseille. The docking of cruise ships intensifies air pollution. Christophe Simon/AFP

Is the Mediterranean Basin really a hotspot of environmental change?

The Mediterranean region, with its biodiversity, climate, demographics, and economic activities such as tourism, agriculture and fisheries, is particularly vulnerable to environmental risks.
Shutterstock

It might be the world’s biggest ocean, but the mighty Pacific is in peril

The Pacific Ocean produces oxygen, helps regulates the weather, provides food and livelihoods. It’s a place of fun, solace and spiritual connection. But its delicate ecology is under threat.
Many Caribbean reefs are now dominated by sponges. from www.shutterstock.com

The rise of sponges in Anthropocene reef ecosystems

Marine sponges are ancient organisms that have survived mass extinctions. Many are more tolerant of climate change and may dominate over corals in future reef systems.
Researchers studied reef sands at Heron Island, Hawaii, Bermuda and Tetiaroa. In this photo, white areas show the predominance of sand on reefs. Southern Cross University

Our acid oceans will dissolve coral reef sands within decades

Ocean acidification poses an increasing threat to the sediments that form the framework of coral reefs - within around 30 years, these carbonate sands may no longer be able to form.

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