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Articles on US Congress

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Thousands of Armenian-Americans gather to commemorate the 103rd anniversary of the Armenian Genocide. Los Angeles, California on April 24, 2018. Ronen Tivony/Nur via Getty Images

Armenian genocide: US recognition of Turkey’s killing of 1.5 million was tangled up in decades of geopolitics

As Armenian Genocide Remembrance Day is marked around the globe, a historian examines the little-known players in the long-running fight in the US Congress to pass a bill acknowledging the Genocide.
Despite voter dissatisfaction with the Republican and Democratic parties, they are likely to persist. Shutterstock/Victor Moussa

The two-party system is here to stay

Despite the fact that only 38% of Americans say they think the Democratic and Republican parties are doing ‘an adequate job,’ they’re unlikely to disappear.
The U.S. House of Representatives brought 11 articles of impeachment against Andrew Johnson. Photo by The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Images

4 myths the Trump team promoted about Andrew Johnson

Falsehoods about Andrew Johnson have become a staple of Republican arguments opposing the impeachment of Trump.
In an official White House photo, President Donald Trump stands alone. Shealah Craighead/White House

Trump, like Obama, tests the limits of presidential war powers

Both President Trump and President Obama used military force without informing Congress, or getting its approval. But the differences reveal more than the similarities.
Republican lawmakers are seen as Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) oversees a vote on the second article of impeachment against President Donald Trump in the House of Representatives, Dec. 18, 2019. Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Congressional Republicans abandon constitutional heritage and Watergate precedents in defense of Trump

An expert on Watergate says that today’s House Republicans have taken precisely the opposite position than the GOP took in 1974 on the president’s power to withhold documents from Congress.
Congress holds the power to propose and approve the federal budget. Patsy Lynch/ MediaPunch /IPX

Why Congress would keep working during a government shutdown

Even if other parts of the federal government shut down, Congress could – and would have to – keep working. A legal scholar explains why and how that is possible.

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