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Articles sur Neurobiology

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Medical treatments involving neurostimulation, or cerebral electromagnetic stimulation, are resurfacing and appear to be more effective than drugs for treating depression. Shutterstock

Neurostimulation may herald a new treatment for depression

Medical treatments involving neurostimulation are resurfacing and appear to be more effective than drugs in treating depression.
Different MR images help us unravel the mysteries of the brain. A diffusion MRI tractography reconstruction like this reveals the complicated wiring deep within a person’s brain. Thijs Dhollander

Some women seem to lack a key brain structure for smell – but their sense of smell is fine

Odd findings in a brain scan of a 29-year-old woman have scientists asking new questions about how our sense of smell really works.
Rita Levi-Montalcini celebrates her 100th birthday in 2009. Presidenza della Repubblica Italiana/Wikimedia Commons

Dismissed under Mussolini, later Nobel prize winner – the importance of scientist Rita Levi-Montalcini

Born in Italy in 1909, Levi-Montalcini avoided being transported to Auschwitz as a young woman and rose to prominence as a neurobiologist. She was a co-recipient of the 1986 Nobel Prize for Medicine.
Could this be the world’s largest Fitbit? Supplied

Why it’s so important to understand how elephants sleep

By understanding sleep across animals we can gain insights into improving the quality of human sleep. It can also help to bolster conservation management strategies for the animals in question.
Little does this woman know what happens to her brain when she licks the ice cream. from www.shutterstock.com

Health Check: does my brain really freeze when I eat ice cream?

It’s a long, hot summer’s day and you’re looking forward to an ice cream. But within seconds of your first bite, you feel a headache coming on: a brain freeze. What’s going on?
Is addiction a brain disease or a disease of choice? Addiction definition image via www.shutterstock.com.

Is addiction a brain disease?

What exactly is addiction? What role, if any, does choice play? And if addiction involves choice, how can we call it a “brain disease,” with its implications of involuntariness?
People are notoriously bad at filtering choices - being faced with too many leads us to choose poorly. Image sourced from www.shutterstock.com

AUDIO Q&A: Neuroeconomics and the answer to the ‘curse of choice’

We are faced with a myriad of choice in our lives - but an emerging body of work suggests the more choice we’re faced with, the more likely we’ll make a poor decision. The conundrum is called the “curse…

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