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The AstraZeneca vaccine was 70 per cent effective against symptomatic COVID-19 infection in a large multinational study, and recently reported 76 per cent overall efficacy against symptomatic COVID-19 in another large study done primarily in the United States. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

AZ COVID-19 vaccine FAQ: The answers you’re looking for

In the wake of COVID-19, the 2020s may be a time when we reconsider how we work, run governments and have fun, just as the 1920s were. This illustration of a flapper girl, created by artist Russell Patterson in the 1920s, captures the style of that era. (Library of Congress)

Will the end of COVID-19 usher in a second Roaring ’20s?

A woman is pictured at the window of her west Toronto apartment in March 2020 as her landlord issued eviction notices at the start of the pandemic. Secure and affordable housing is a big concern of those collecting social assistance, whether it was CERB or provincial programs. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

CERB was luxurious compared to provincial social assistance

We’re still studying the long-term implications of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic on populations. (Shutterstock)

COVID-19 pandemic may produce dramatic changes in populations

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is reducing life expectancy, decreasing birth rates and slowing down immigration. These changes may produce concerning trends in populations globally.
Annie Storey holds a cross with a photo of her late son Alex Storey, before a march to mark the five-year anniversary of British Columbia declaring a public health emergency in the overdose crisis, in Vancouver, on April 14, 2021. CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare decades of drug policy failures

Across the country, overdose deaths have spiked during the COVID-19 pandemic.
The pandemic shone a spotlight on the plight of exotic animals after the Netflix Tiger King series. It also resulted in a run on pet adoptions. But what is the state of animal welfare more than a year into the crisis? Tom Copus/Unsplash

COVID-19: The best and worst of times for animals

One year ago, the 'Tiger King' docuseries raised public concern about animal cruelty to new heights. But what's happened to animals since?
Governments could capitalize on the growth of telecommuting to promote more car-free lifestyles. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

COVID-19 could end our dependence on cars — if we ‘build back better’

The pandemic could be a boon to car use, but it would be a mistake for governments to let that happen. There's a golden opportunity to push towards a zero-carbon transportation system.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford puts his mask on after announcing new lockdown measures at a press conference at Queen’s Park in Toronto on April 16, 2021. The government later walked back some of the announced restrictions. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Doug Ford’s dangerous communication failures in COVID-19 third wave

As the third wave ravages Ontario, there is public confusion and mistrust. Premier Ford's flip-flops on restrictions indicate not just poor risk communications, but the lack of an informed plan.
Children’s increased screen time, exacerbated by remote learning during COVID-19, is directly contributing to increases in childhood myopia. (iStock)

How the COVID-19 pandemic is damaging children’s vision

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in children spending more time on digital devices, which may have a long-term impact on their vision, including the risk of myopia.
Colorized scanning electron micrograph of a cell (orange) infected with UK B.1.1.7 variant SARS-CoV-2 virus particles (green), isolated from a patient sample. Image captured at the NIAID Integrated Research Facility (IRF) in Fort Detrick, Maryland. (NIAID)

COVID-19 variants FAQ: Are they more contagious?

Variants of the original SARS-CoV-2 are now in wide circulation. That means the third wave of COVID-19 has come with new questions about the variants, their effects and what might come next.
Social isolation, physical distancing and stay-at-home orders have changed people’s abilities to date during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Shutterstock)

Sex coaching can help strengthen connections during COVID-19

Public health measures have affected dating during the pandemic. This could be an opportunity for people to learn more about their intimate desires to develop deeper connections with others.
People in masks shop for essential items at Costco in Mississauga, Ont., on April 18, 2021. Costco insists its in-store customers wear masks even if they claim exemptions. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Pandemic-era retail: No shoes, no shirt, no mask — no service?

Retailers are grappling with anti-maskers during the pandemic. That's because of the complicated relationship between businesses and customers when it comes to accommodating health conditions.
A woman tears up as she attends a community rally in Los Angeles to raise awareness of anti-Asian violence and racist attitudes, in response to the string of violent racist attacks against Asians during the pandemic. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Rising rates of domestic and social violence during COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has not only increased risk factors for violence, but also simultaneously decreased resiliency for individuals as well as communities.
Remote work — with its countless and never-ending online meetings — is taking its toll on employees. (Shutterstock)

Zoom fatigue and distracted driving share multitasking

As remote work continues through the pandemic, workers are experiencing burnout and fatigue brought on by excessive periods of time spent online.
The health crisis and confinement of COVID-19 has led to unusual brain activity, causing insomnia, trouble concentrating or agitation. (Shutterstock)

COVID-19 restrictions take a toll on brain function

When dealing with a difficult event, such as the current pandemic, the electrical current that governs our brains is altered, affecting behaviour and mood.

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