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Articles on Quantum physics

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The Dalai Lama speaks about quantum effects with Chinese scientists at the Main Tibetan Temple, Nov. 1, 2018, in Dharamshala, India. Shyam Sharma/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

What Buddhism and science can teach each other – and us – about the universe

Amid trying times, the collaboration between Western science and Eastern philosophy provides numerous health benefits and a path to understanding the natural world.
Woodcut from Camille Flammarion’s 1888 book L'Atmosphère : météorologie populaire. The caption reads: ‘A missionary of the Middle Ages tells that he had found the point where the sky and the Earth touch’ and continues, ‘What is there, then, in this blue sky, which certainly exists, and which veils the stars during the day?’ Wikipedia

Einstein’s two mistakes

Albert Einstein may have been the ultimate example of a visionary genius, but that did not stop him from twice losing his way due to beliefs that were perhaps not so scientific.
Héloïse Chochois, "Embedded with Physicists” “Physics Reimagined” coll.

Seven common myths about quantum physics

Quantum physics and its mysteries… And what if this supposedly incomprehensible science weren’t so difficult for non-scientists to understand?
Quantum physics can offer astonishing insights into the different modalities of innovation in large companies and startups. Zita/Shutterstock

Innovation decoherence

The study of innovation in large companies and start-ups would benefit from being inspired by physics, which mobilizes different sets of laws for large masses and particles.
Galaxy history revealed by the Hubble Space Telescope. NASA

What is nothing? Martin Rees Q&A

From a mysterious energy of empty space to parallel universes, cosmology's view of 'nothing' is anything but boring.
In the Back to the Future movies, the DeLorean car was able to travel through time thanks to a flux capacitor. Wikimedia/Oto Godfrey and Justin Morton

We’ve designed a ‘flux capacitor’, but it won’t take us Back to the Future

Physicists have designed an electrical component that breaks time-reversal symmetry. Not quite the time machine from Hollywood but it should help with communication technology and quantum computing.
An illustration of the two 20-micrometre-wide vibrating drumheads, each composed of trillions of atoms, in an entangled quantum state of motion. Petja Hyttinen and Olli Hanhirova, ARKH Architects Ltd.

Experiment shows Einstein’s quantum ‘spooky action’ approaches the human scale

We usually think of quantum entanglement in the realm of atomic systems, but now it's been scaled up to relatively massive objects. This opens the door to new kinds of technology.

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