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The older you get, the more slowly you heal, and there are a number of reasons why. Westend61 via Getty Images

Why do older people heal more slowly?

Healing is a complicated process. As people age, higher rates of disease and the fact that old cells lose the ability to divide slow this process down.
Safety precautions like wearing face masks and leaving space between desks are also important to limit the coronavirus’s spread. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

Reopening elementary schools carries less COVID-19 risk than high schools – but that doesn’t guarantee safety

New research points to why reopening elementary schools is the safest bet and what else needs to happen for schools to have the best chance of staying open.
Students and parents at California’s Hollywood High School go through temperature checks before picking up laptops for online learning. Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images

Kids are bigger coronavirus spreaders than many doctors realized – here’s how schools can lower the risk

Checking for symptoms is just the beginning. Here are 10 ways schools can help keep children, families and faculty safe.
Margot Gage Witvliet was hospitalized with COVID-19 in March. More than four months later, she has yet to recover. Courtesy of Margot Gage Witvliet

I’m a COVID-19 long-hauler and an epidemiologist – here’s how it feels when symptoms last for months

Margot Gage Witvliet went from being healthy and active to fearing she was dying almost overnight. An epidemiologist, she dug into the research to understand what's happening to long-haulers like her.
The Texas frosted elfin (Callophrys irus hadros), a small butterfly subspecies found only in Arkansas, Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana, has lost most of its prairie habitat and is thought to have dramatically declined over the last century. Matthew D. Moran

Insect apocalypse? Not so fast, at least in North America

Recent reports of dramatic declines in insect populations have sparked concern about an 'insect apocalypse.' But a new analysis of data from sites across North America suggests the case isn't proven.
Are cats really to blame for the worldwide loss of biodiversity? Dzurag/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Don’t blame cats for destroying wildlife – shaky logic is leading to moral panic

Framing cats as responsible for declines in biodiversity is based on faulty scientific logic and fails to account for the real culprit – human activity.

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