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Artículos sobre Political violence

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When persuasion stops and violence begins, that’s the line between ‘legitimate political discourse’ and something very different, scholars explain. AP Photo/John Minchillo

What is ‘legitimate political discourse,’ and does it include the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol?

Legitimate political discourse is based on persuasion, not coercion or violence. Two scholars of communication and democracy explain the difference.
Rioters are tear-gassed as they storm the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

American support for conspiracy theories and armed rebellion isn’t new – we just didn’t believe it before the Capitol insurrection

Almost eight years before the Jan. 6, 2021 Capitol attack, nearly one-third of Americans surveyed – and 44% of Republicans – said armed rebellion might soon be necessary in the US to protect liberties.
Northern Irish protesters on April 7, 2021, burn the Peace Gate in Belfast, built in the 1990s to separate the city’s warring Protestant and Catholic communities. Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

Northern Ireland, born of strife 100 years ago, again erupts in political violence

Brexit has reopened an old battle over Northern Irish identity, leading to clashes in the street. Scores have been injured in the troubled UK territory’s worst outbreak of violence in decades.
The U.S. was one of 33 countries to experience election-related violence in 2020 – the worst year for peaceful elections ever. Brent Stirton/Getty Images

Election violence spiked worldwide in 2020 – will this year be better?

Elections are getting less safe in democracies and nondemocracies alike. Last year was the bloodiest year for elections in decades, with 54% of all national votes marred by some kind of violence.
Parler is similar to Twitter but doesn’t control or discourage hate speech or calls to violence. OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Image

Big Tech’s rejection of Parler shuts down a site favored by Trump supporters – and used by participants in the US Capitol insurrection

Millions of supporters of Donald Trump flocked to the far-right social media platform, where hate speech and calls for violence thrive. The US Capitol insurrection could be the platform’s undoing.
A supporter of President Donald Trump, seen wearing a QAnon shirt, is confronted by Capitol Police officers outside the Senate Chamber during the invasion of the U.S. Capitol. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

QAnon and the storm of the U.S. Capitol: The offline effect of online conspiracy theories

Conspiracy theories spread online are the backbone of Donald Trump’s falsehoods about his loss in the U.S. election. The real world consequences of those conspiracies have now exploded.

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