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Artículos sobre Quebec

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Six-year-old Makai'ryn Terrio, centre, cools off with his brothers as they play in water fountains in Montréal. The city had its hottest August on record. The Canadian Press/Graham Hughes

What climate change means for southern Ontario and Québec

Southern Québec is warming twice as rapidly as the rest of the world due to the progressive loss of snow cover. An average annual warming of 3 C to 6 C is expected by the end of the century.
In February, the Innu Council of Ekuanitshit and the Minganie Regional County Municipality declared the Muteshekau Shipu (Magpie River) a legal person, a move that may provide greater certainty for this majestic river’s future. (Boreal River)

Rights for nature: How granting a river ‘personhood’ could help protect it

A recent declaration of a river as a legal person in Canada recognizes Indigenous laws and governance, and champions people as the guardians of nature.
Worried about another 1980s-style constitutional crisis? Don’t be. There may be less than meets the eye to Québec Premier François Legault’s recent constitutional proposals. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

What’s behind Québec’s latest, and largely superficial, constitutional gambit

Québec Premier François Legault’s recent constitutional proposals have caused alarm. But it’s largely a game aimed at finding common ground between federalist and separatist voters in the province.
In Québec, the biggest child care provider by far is schools. Here, children raise their hands at a care centre in Montréal in August 2006. CP PHOTO/Ian Barrett

Ottawa’s $10-a-day child care promise should heed Québec’s insights about balancing low fees with high quality

As provinces and territories beyond Québec develop early learning and care plans, they should be aware of the pitfalls of taking shortcuts in response to parent demand.
The Northern Bruce Peninsula in Ontario has been a popular domestic tourism destination during COVID-19. Luke Smith/Unsplash

The COVID-19 pandemic has created regional tourism hotspots as big cities suffer

Large Canadian cities, usually major tourist destinations, have have experienced drastic declines in tourists and tourism spending while some regional hotspots have been overwhelmed with visitors.
People take part in a demonstration in Montréal in November 2020 to protest against government funding for infrastructure projects at two English-language educational institutions and also calling on the city to set up a body to protect the French language. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

New official languages plan aims to end the decline of French in Canada

The federal government’s ambitious new plan to modernize the 51-year-old Official Languages Act is the most significant proposal on the status of French in Canada since 1982.
A resident chats with workers at Orchard Villa Long-Term Care in Pickering, Ont., in June 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn)

Resistance, innovation, improvisation: When governments fell short during COVID-19, long-term care workers stepped up

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the scarcity of resources in long-term care. But it has also revealed how staff are undervalued.
According to a recent survey of public servants by the Commissioner of Official Languages, more than 44 per cent of French-speakers are uncomfortable using French at work. CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

A ‘French malaise’ is eroding bilingualism in Canada’s public service

A recent survey reveals a general uneasiness about using French among both francophone and anglophone public servants in administrative regions where bilingualism is required.
A young girl places a candle during a vigil for the victims of the mosque shooting on Jan, 30, 2017 in Québec City. In the years since the attack, little has been done to combat the Islamophobia that caused it. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Remembering the Québec City mosque attack: Islamophobia and Canada’s national amnesia

Four years after the violent attack on worshippers at Québec City’s central mosque, the federal government has said it will honour the victims with a national day of remembrance.
A Scottish Saltire flag hangs in the window of an apartment in Edinburgh, Scotland, next to the EU flag in August 2020. Scotland could vote to separate from the U.K. in 2021. (AP Photo/David Cheskin)

Scotland could vote to separate in 2021, testing Canada’s independence formula

Scotland’s renewed push for independence is not only similar to Québec’s — there are also lessons for Scottish politicians in Canadian law on the concept of separation.
This pandemic year has prompted a lot of reinvention and food favourites are no exception, including the traditional tourtière. (The Conversation Canada)

Poutine in a pie: Would you eat a ‘tourtine’ this holiday season?

Culinary invention is a reinterpretation of heritage. The success of the tourtine in this pandemic year suggests that we feel the need to rethink the traditional dishes of the holiday season.
Demonstrators hold a vigil marking the death of Joyce Echaquan, who recorded insults hurled at her by staff at the Joliette, QC, hospital while she was there for treatment. The Canadian Press/Paul Chiasson

Joyce Echaquan’s death: How a decolonizing approach could help tackle racism in health care

Joyce’s Principle seeks to shift the way health services are provided to Indigenous communities and ensure they are free of discrimination.
Close to 3,000 Quebecers gathered at the Paul-Sauvé arena hours before the invocation of the War Measures Act would send Canadian troops onto the streets of the province and many people – some of them at the arena rally – were arrested in subsequent raids. Éditions du Septentrion, CC BY-NC-ND

October Crisis, 1970: Crackdown ignited by authorities’ fear of young people

A new book argues that the War Measures Act was a response to the threat young people posed to authorities.
A newsboy holds up a newspaper with a banner headline reporting the invoking of the War Measures Act on Oct. 16, 1970, following the kidnapping of British diplomat James Cross and Québec Labour Minister Pierre Laporte by the FLQ. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Peter Bregg

The powerful message of the FLQ’s October manifesto

After the FLQ manifesto was broadcast in October 1970, Québecers felt uplifted. It expressed many of their concerns. That changed after Pierre Laporte was found dead in the trunk of a car.
Organizers sing at a demonstration to denounce racism and police violence, June 7, 2020, in front of the legislature in Québec City. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jacques Boissinot

Celebrating diversity isn’t enough: Schools need anti-racist curriculum

Québec’s schools operate in a model of inter-culturalism, while schools across Canada are shaped by the vision of multiculturalism. Neither approach critically addresses racism.

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