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Articles sur Neurodegenerative disease

Affichage de 1 à 20 de 29 articles

Rhesus macaques experience an aging process similar to people’s. Goddard Photography/E+ via Getty Images

Expanding Alzheimer’s research with primates could overcome the problem with treatments that show promise in mice but don’t help humans

Nonhuman primates like rhesus monkeys share certain characteristics with people that may make them better study subjects than mice for research on neurodegenerative diseases.
The U.S. BRAIN Initiative seeks to elucidate the connection between brain structure and function. Science Photo Library - PASIEKA/Brand X Pictures via Getty Images

Illuminating the brain one neuron and synapse at a time – 5 essential reads about how researchers are using new tools to map its structure and function

From figuring out where memories are stored to how sensory information translates to behavior, new technologies are helping neuroscientists better understand how the brain works.
Eliminating human guesswork can make for faster and more accurate research. KTSDESIGN/Science Photo Library via Getty Images

New AI technique identifies dead cells under the microscope 100 times faster than people can – potentially accelerating research on neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s

Understanding when and how neurons die is an important part of research on neurodegenerative diseases like Lou Gehrig’s, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.
A plant fruit in Nigeria shows potential for a new drug for epilepsy treatment. Kateryn Kon/Science Photo Library

A plant grown in Nigeria shows potential for epilepsy treatment

An extract of a plant’s fruit in Nigeria could protect against seizure and prevent brain degeneration. It could therefore be studied further for the development of a new antiepileptic drug.
We knew people with Parkinson’s disease were at heightened risk of developing addictive behaviours like gambling. Our research gives insight into why this is. From shutterstock.com

Why do many people with Parkinson’s disease develop an addiction? We built a virtual casino to find out

About one in six people who take the most common medication for Parkinson’s disease will develop addictive behaviours. We found whether this happens depends on a person’s unique brain structure.
An MRI image of the brain. SpeedKingz/Shutterstock.com

An unexpected pathway to treating neurodegenerative diseases

Not all drug development needs to start from scratch. Sometimes researchers discover that a drug developed for one disease can be used for another. Here a cancer drug may show promise for dementia.
Figuring out the pieces to the Alzheimer’s puzzle. Naeblys/Shutterstock.com

Time for a Manhattan Project on Alzheimer’s

Many pieces leading to Alzheimer’s disease have been identified. To put the pieces together, one scholar argues that the government should launch a Manhattan Project-scale effort to find a cure.
Cyanobacterial blooms and algae are common in water bodies around the world. However, Australia is yet to monitor the growth of neurotoxins in our algae. from www.shutterstock.com

Toxin linked to motor neuron disease found in Australian algal blooms

A toxic chemical produced by algae and linked to motor neuron disease has been detected in NSW rivers. Its presence - long suspected but now confirmed - could be linked to a disease hotspot in the Riverina.
Happy-looking seniors via Shutterstock. From www.shutterstock.com

Why dementia burden may be less than feared

Improvements in education and vascular health are likely partly responsible for a sharp decline in dementia over the past few decades. The trend may continue, if we also address obesity and diabetes.

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