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Articles sur Public trust

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People lose faith in science when it takes a political side. AP Photo/Wong Maye-E

When scientific journals take sides during an election, the public’s trust in science takes a hit

When the scientific establishment gets involved in partisan politics, surveys suggest, there are unintended consequences – especially for conservatives.
WE Charity’s Marc Kielburger, left, and Craig Kielburger, right, appear as witnesses via videoconference at a House of Commons finance committee hearing in Ottawa in July 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

WE Charity demise shows why trust, transparency are so critical for NGOs

On paper, WE Charity could have been the best partner to implement the federal government's student grant program. But the failure to be transparent eroded the public's trust and led to its demise.
Parents and the public are in the dark about how Alberta developed its back-to-school plan. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Alberta’s COVID-19 back-to-school plans lack transparency

Vague references don't cut it. The public deserves to know exactly how Alberta is relying on science, realism and high-quality problem-solving in its back to school plans during COVID-19.
Most Australians have had enough of the opportunistic point-scoring that characterises politics today and want leaders who put the public interest first. Mick Tsikas/Lukas Coch/AAP

New research shows Australians lack faith in our political parties to provide real leadership

According to a new survey, nearly a third of Australians believe the Coalition shows no 'leadership for the public good'. Labor fared little better.
Former NSW minister Ian Macdonald (left) and union boss John Maitland are just two of the prominent figures who have been swept up in anti-corruption investigations at the state level. Joel Carrett/AAP

Australians think our politicians are corrupt, but where is the evidence?

Public trust in government is sliding and there's a perception that a small elite is reaping the benefits of political influence. This points to the need for a federal anti-corruption body.
Judge Brett Kavanaugh is a polarizing figure — either partisan Republican or impartial jurist, depending on who you ask. AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Supreme Court polarization is not inevitable — just look at Europe

Controversial judicial appointments and divisive court rulings are not the norm everywhere. Here's what the US could learn from Europe about ensuring ideological balance on the Supreme Court.

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