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Articles sur Wildlife conservation

Affichage de 161 à 180 de 384 articles

Researchers in Maine pose with terns after measuring, weighing and banding the birds. But what if they weren’t scientists? Amanda Boyd, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service/Flickr

Even scientists take selfies with wild animals. Here’s why they shouldn’t.

Why do so many people take safety risks or abuse wild animals for the sake of a photo with them? In one researcher's view, scientists may encourage this trend by sharing their own wildlife selfies.
Spangled perch are one of Australia’s strongly migratory native fish. After storms in January 2015 these fish were actively travelling up a flooded road in outback Northern Territory. Jessica Brown

We can have fish and dams: here’s how

Freshwater fish are declining everywhere, in part thanks to dam-building. But we can have both.
Doing its own thing: the eastern coyote, or coywolf, is a mix of coyote, wolf and dog which has spread across eastern North America. Jonathan Way, www.EasternCoyoteResearch.com

Why the eastern coyote should be a separate species: the ‘coywolf’

A wildlife biologist argues that the canid in eastern North America – known as the eastern coyote, or the coywolf by some – deserves to be classified as a separate species.
Lonesome National Park is home to some of the last remaining brigalow woodland.

EcoCheck: can the Brigalow Belt bounce back?

Science was instrumental in working out how to clear brigalow forest to make way for farming in the 20th century. Now it's trying to bring these iconic forests back.

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