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Artikel-artikel mengenai Australian history

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Uncle Fred Deeral as little old man in the film The Message, by Zakpage, to be shown at the National Museum of Australia in April. Nik Lachajczak of Zakpage

An honest reckoning with Captain Cook’s legacy won’t heal things overnight. But it’s a start

An honest reckoning with Captain Cook’s legacy won’t heal things overnight. But it’s a start. The Conversation41,4 MB (download)
The impact of 1770 has never eased for Aboriginal people. It was a collision of catastrophic proportions.
A picture titled ‘Captain Cook taking possession of the Australian continent on behalf of the British crown, AD 1770’. Drawn and engraved by Samuel Calvert from an historical painting by Gilfillan in the possession of the Royal Society of Victoria. Trove/National Library of Australia

Captain Cook ‘discovered’ Australia, and other myths from old school text books

To find out how the teaching of Captain Cook in Australian schools has changed, I examined textbooks used in the 1950s until today.
Kath Walker (Oodgeroo Noonuccal) with Doug Nicholls on Frenchman’s Beach, La Perouse, on April 29 1970. During the Cook bicentenary protest, activists declared a day of mourning for Aboriginal nations. Image from the Tribune collection from the 1970 Cook Bi-centenary protest, to be featured in the State Library of NSW's upcoming exhibition 'Eight Days in Gamay.'

Cooking the books: how re-enactments of the Endeavour’s voyage perpetuate myths of Australia’s ‘discovery’

Re-enactments of James Cook's arrival in Australia have served only to gloss over the violence of his interactions with Indigenous people and elevate Australia's imperial and British connections.
In 1948, as Cecil George Harris lay dying after a tractor accident, he scratched a final message into the vehicle’s fender. illustration supplied by: Impact Studios/Dinalie Dabarera.

An unsent SMS, a message on a tractor, a poem: the courts say a valid will can take many forms

Courts have had to consider whether an eggshell, a tractor fender, a petticoat hem, graffiti on a wall, and a poem might be valid wills. They've shown surprising flexibility in judgment.
Though illegal, fortune telling was only sporadically prosecuted. Here, two women set up tents at the 1913 Adelaide Children’s Hospital fete. State Library of SA

Did they see it coming? How fortune-telling took hold in Australia - with women as clients and criminals

In the early 1900s, fortune-telling provided entertainment, social connection and a job for some Australians. Its legal status made criminals of women, yet allowed others entry to the police force.
Australian families have been sitting down in front of the TV on New Year’s Eve for over 60 years. Wikimedia Commons

What Australia watched on TV on New Year’s Eve, 1959

From Clint Eastwood to Bert Newton – here's what Melbourne could watch on that new technology, the television set, to see in the new decade.
Waters from the Herbert River, which runs toward one of northern Australia’s richest agricultural districts, could be redirected under a Bradfield scheme. Patrick White

‘New Bradfield’: rerouting rivers to recapture a pioneering spirit

The ‘New Bradfield’ scheme seeks to revive a nation-building ethos supposedly stifled by bureaucratic inertia. But there are good reasons the scheme never became a reality.
Elephants destined for Wirths’ circus on a ship’s deck circa 1925. Early last century, Frances Levvy asked school students to write an essay on whether the exhibition of wild animals in travelling menageries was consistent with humanity. By Sam Hood ca. 1925-ca. 1945, State Library of NSW

Hidden women of history: Frances Levvy, Australia’s quietly radical early animal rights campaigner

Born in 1831, at a time when animals were widely regarded as property, Frances Levvy used the power of the press and the passion of children to advocate for their welfare.
The anti-transportation ‘ladies petition’ from 1850 is one of the first concrete examples of political engagement by women in the NSW colony. Parliament of NSW

Sydney’s 9,189 ‘sister politicians’ who petitioned Queen Victoria

A newly-discovered petition from 1850 provides rare evidence of what might be women's first moment of political activism in Australia.
You might not know the name, but you would recognise the songs. Mojo was the advertising agency behind such classics as You Ought to be Congratulated. Screenshot/YouTube

Mojo: the rise and fall of an Australian advertising empire

The ABC documentary, How Australia Got Its Mojo, purported to tell the story of advertising agency Mojo. But the real story is more complex.

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