Menu Close

Artikel-artikel mengenai Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine

Menampilkan 1 - 20 dari 144 artikel

Millions of U.S. children between the ages of 6 months and 4 years will soon be eligible for COVID-19 shots. FatCamera/E+ via Getty Images

At last, COVID-19 shots for little kids – 5 essential reads

The FDA’s authorization of COVID-19 shots for children ages 6 months to 4 years will bring relief for millions of parents. Pending CDC endorsement, shots for this group will be available within days.
Millions of U.S. children ages 5-11 have already received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Keith Birmingham/MediaNews Group/Pasadena Star-News via Getty Images

COVID-19 vaccines for the youngest children may be inching closer to authorization – a pediatrician explains how they’re being tested

Moderna will ask the FDA to allow emergency use for its vaccine in children as young as 6 months, a step many parents have been anticipating.
Preliminary research suggests that the omicron variant may potentially induce a robust immune response. Olga Siletskaya/Moment via Getty Images

Is the omicron variant Mother Nature’s way of vaccinating the masses and curbing the pandemic?

Some of the omicron variant’s unique properties – such as its ability to spread rapidly while causing milder COVID-19 infections – could usher in a new phase of the pandemic.
Some vaccines use mRNA to make copies of the triangular red spike proteins to induce immunity. Juan Gaertner/Science Photo Library via Getty Images

How can scientists update coronavirus vaccines for omicron? A microbiologist answers 5 questions about how Moderna and Pfizer could rapidly adjust mRNA vaccines

The new omicron variant of coronavirus has a number of mutations that may require manufacturers to update vaccines. The unique attributes of mRNA vaccines make updating them fast and easy.
Research suggests that about 20% of all prescriptions are administered “off-label.” Hafakot/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Off-label’ use is common in medicine – a bioethicist and legal philosopher explain why the COVID-19 vaccines are different

The CDC’s COVID-19 vaccine provider agreement prohibits health care professionals from administering the vaccines in people for whom they are not yet authorized or approved. But this departs from longstanding norms.
Carter Giglio, 8, joined by service dog Barney of Hero Dogs, shows off the bandage over his injection site after being vaccinated at Children’s National Hospital in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

I’m an infectious disease doctor. Yes, I’m vaccinating our 5-year-old against COVID-19. Here is why you should too.

An infectious diseases doctor reviews the evidence, discusses hesitancy and concerns about side-effects and explains the overwhelming case for vaccinating five-to-11-year-olds, including his own son.
Ethics are important to vaccination decisions because while science can clarify some of the costs and benefits, it cannot tell us which costs and benefits matter most to us. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Ethical decisions: Weighing risks and benefits of approving COVID-19 vaccination in children ages 5-11

When making the decision whether to vaccinate children aged five to 11 against COVID-19, regulators in Canada must rely on sound ethics as well as sound science.
The FDA and CDC are recommending use of a third shot, or “booster dose” for certain groups of people in the U.S. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Tense decision-making as CDC joins FDA in recommending Pfizer booster shot for 65 & up, people at high risk and those with occupational exposure to COVID-19

Fault lines between the FDA and CDC regulatory processes have been on full display in the decisions over which groups of Americans should receive the Pfizer booster shot.
In the reluctance to vaccinate, there is a lack of trust and understanding of the scientific process. Better communication would help rebuild bridges. The Canadian Press/Paul Chiasson

A researcher’s view on COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy: The scientific process needs to be better explained

Before the pandemic, the public perceived science as infallible and inaccessible. But the opening up of research to the general public has changed that perception.

Kontributor teratas

Lebih banyak