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Artikel-artikel mengenai Remembrance Day

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‘Isolated Grave and Camouflage, Vimy Ridge,’ by Mary Riter Hamilton, May 1919, oil on wove paper. (Library and Archives Canada, Acc. No. 1988-180-223, Copy negative C-141851)

Remembrance Day: How a Canadian painter broke boundaries on the First World War battlefields

After Canadian painter Mary Riter Hamilton was rejected for service as a war artist because she was a woman, she trekked battlefields to create more than 320 works that recall the missing soldiers.
Dispatch rider with pigeons leaving for firing line, His Majesty’s Pigeon Service, November 1917, location unknown. (William Rider-Rider. Canada. Department of National Defence. Library and Archives Canada, PA-002034)

First World War poet Wilfred Owen, treated for shell shock, carried readers into the horror of war

British poet Wilfred Owen told readers there is no peace for the dying soldier until we fight against the lie that it is sweet and proper to die for one's country.
The 1919 Victory Parade passes down Whitehall, to mark the end of World War I. PA Archive/PA Images

Remembrance Day: the enduring nature of the first two-minute silence

The first two-minute silence in 1919 was designed as a moment that could unite people across many divides. It has become a collective means of commemoration for all manner of tragedies
Memory can serve as a heavy reminder of the past. Indigenous people gather in Shubenacadie, N.S., in June 2008 to remember the residents of a former residential school and the abuses they suffered. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mike Dembeck

The importance of personal memory on Remembrance Day

Memories can be powerful tools to address humanity’s most difficult political, sociological and environmental problems
Virgin Australia is a dogged publicity hunter. The nation’s second-best known Minogue, Dannii, helped launch its first flight from Sydney to Hong Kong in June 2018. AAP Image/Supplied by Virgin Australia

On the offensive: why Virgin Australia gets called a publicity hound

Virgin Australia’s great military blunder of 2018 is a case study in corporate social responsibility gone wrong.
Poppies at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra. katatrix/shuttershock.com

Flowers, remembrance and the art of war

The wildflowers that WWI soldiers encountered in Europe become symbols of remembrance and the fragility of life. The red poppy in particular is a powerful motif in Australian war art and photography.
Students should be taught to recognise the political, social, and economic factors that influence how a society conducts and participates in memorialisation of the past. David Crosling/AAP

Why children need to be taught to think critically about Remembrance Day

Teaching students to recognise and understanding the political, social, and economic factors that influence how we celebrate Remembrance Day would make them more active citizens.
A road sign in the Granite Belt, in Queensland. Louise Grayson

Friday essay: Camarade – The Earth

Forty six thousand Australians died on the Western Front. After WWI, diggers were resettled in Queensland's Granite Belt, where suburbs were named after battle sites. Our photo essay explores these poignant places today.
The internet offers a chance to personalise our commemoration by choosing when, where and how we take part. Stefan Wermuth/Reuters

This Remembrance Day, digital commemoration makes it impossible to forget

The internet and social media are changing how we commemorate war. The hashtag #LestWeForget will be shared millions of times on Remembrance Day in tweets and Facebook comments.

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