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Dalhousie University

Founded in 1818, Dalhousie University is Atlantic Canada’s leading research-intensive university, driving the region’s intellectual, social and economic development.

Dalhousie is a truly national and international university, with more than half of our nearly 19,000 students coming from outside of Nova Scotia. Our 6,000 faculty and staff foster a diverse, purpose-driven community, one that spans 13 faculties and conducts over $135 million in research each year.

With 80 per cent of Nova Scotia’s publicly funded research, and as one of Canada’s leading universities for industry collaboration, we’re helping generate the talent, discoveries and innovations that will shape Atlantic Canada’s future.

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Displaying 41 - 60 of 227 articles

55 Canadian citizens and 30 permanent residents were among 176 people who were killed in a tragic plane crash. (Shutterstock)

How we mourn the victims of tragedies depends on their citizenship status

The difference in responses to tragedies reflects how immigrants are valued by their potential benefit to Canadian society, but this is not the only way to think about their worth as human beings.
New guidelines for health-care providers advise supporting every individual to achieve their best health, rather than focusing on weight status. (Shutterstock)

Are we over weight yet? New guidelines aim to reduce obesity stigma in health care

New Canadian clinical practice guidelines for obesity aim to help reduce the prevalence and impact of weight bias and stigma in clinical care, and also encourage the public to advocate for change.
Canada doesn’t extradite people to countries with the death penalty. But there are other ways to put those accused of crimes at serious risk. (Erika Wittlieb/Pixabay)

Is Canada helping other countries kill people?

Canadians should know more about how our government co-operates with other countries in criminal cases. Are we unwittingly risking the lives or rights of those accused of crimes?
People wearing face masks ride an attraction at the Playland amusement park at the Pacific National Exhibition, in Vancouver on July 10, 2020. While Canada has done a better job than other countries at managing COVID-19, its death rate still exceeds that of similar nations. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

How Canada compares to other countries on COVID-19 cases and deaths

While Canada has done well compared to countries like the U.S. and the U.K. in containing COVID-19, rates of infection and deaths are higher than in many similar western democracies. Why?
Household economic stress of the type brought on by COVID-19 is likely resulting in more stressed-out, anxious and hyperactive children, according to past data. (Piqsels)

COVID-19’s economic impact could be stressing out our kids

The effects of economic stress on children are big. Parents’ anxiety about their financial situation is equivalent to the effect of a divorce, and is likely at play amid COVID-19.
During the COVID-19 pandemic, a window is opening for good ideas to move from the fringes to the mainstream — and that includes a four-day work week. (Simon Abrams/Unsplash)

The day is dawning on a four-day work week

The four-day work week is an idea that should make it through the pandemic’s open policy window.
A military guard of honour wear face masks against the spread of the coronavirus by the Unknown Soldier’s Tomb in Warsaw, Poland. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

Poetry has linked war and disease for centuries

From cholera outbreaks to public health actions, war metaphors have long been used to describe diseases, to show what we fear and to explain our world to ourselves.
Wade Watts becomes a better global citizen when he reconnects to the real world in Ernest Cline’s novel ‘Ready Player One.’ Tye Sheridan stars as Watts in Steven Spielberg’s film adaptation. (2018 edition of 'Ready Player One'/Penguin Random House)

Dystopian story ‘Ready Player One’ has tips for life after coronavirus

The bestselling novel turned film exposes paradoxes of fixing a broken system with its own tools. As we collectively meditate on the world’s problems, why not imagine better worlds?
A back alley in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, a high-risk COVID-19 area due to the fact the vulnerable populations converge there, is pictured in January 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Decriminalizing drug use as we contain the coronavirus is the humane thing to do

Drug users are already among the most marginalized and stigmatized populations in times without a pandemic. Unless we decriminalize drug use, once again they will bear the brunt of another deadly disease.
A woman waits for a streetcar in Toronto on April 16, 2020. The many Black people working in essential jobs do not have the luxury of staying home during the pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Coronavirus discriminates against Black lives through surveillance, policing and the absence of health data

Black lives are further in peril in a time of COVID-19. Subject to death on both the public health and policing fronts, we will not be silent.

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