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Indigenous Knowledge

Indigenous Knowledge has been set up as an institution on The Conversation’s platform so we can feature Indigenous knowledge that exists outside formal university settings.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 56 articles

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How 1970s conservation laws turned this ‘paradise on Earth’ into a tinderbox

New research finds the Victorian town of Buchan never experienced catastrophic bushfires, until misguided laws banned the use of burning as a way to control the land.
Family photo in the Borden reserve, published with the family’s permission. Alison Lullfitz

‘We can write novels of memories made here’: Elder-led land restoration is about rebuilding love

For descendants of those stolen, restoring a special family place enables them to reconnect to the past, to people and identity.
Indigenous Rangers pointing to damaged rock art. Left to right: William Campbell, Meryl Gurruwiwi, Aron Thorn, Marcus Lacey, Djorri Gurruwiwi. Jarrad Kowlessar/courtesy of Gumurr Marthakal Indigenous Rangers

From crumbling rock art to exposed ancestral remains, climate change is ravaging our precious Indigenous heritage

Cyclones, floods and other climate change-linked events are threatening Indigenous heritage tens of thousands of years old. Unless we act, they’ll be gone for good.
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Rather than focusing on the negative, we need a strength-based way to approach First Nations childrens’ health

A recent report has found First Nations children in Victoria have better health outcomes, however culturally appropriate research can better highlight what’s going well for First Nations kids’ health.
Dancers performing evening ceremonial Bungul at the Garma Festival in northeast Arnhem Land. Aaron Bunch/AAP Image

Establishing a Voice to Parliament could be an opportunity for Indigenous Nation Building. Here’s what that means

Australian Governments must embrace Indigenous Nation Building if the Uluru Statement is to lead to effective structural reform and self-determined government for First Nations peoples.
Two-eared listening is a critical element for Western advocates of restorative justice. (Shutterstock)

Two-eared listening is essential for understanding restorative justice in Canada

Two-eared listening is based on the idea of learning and understanding, a willingness to be suspend judgement and the desire to communicate respectfully.
Tracker Nat, holding his hat on the far left, with Paul Hasluck standing next to him, holding Nat’s shield in this picture from 1958. National Archives of Australia. NAA: A1200, L28199.

Rediscovering the art of Tracker Nat: ‘the Namatjira of carving’

During the 1950s, Nat made hundreds of carvings. Today, many of these are likely to be lying unidentified in people’s homes and in museum basements.
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Attending school every day counts – but kids in out-of-home care are missing out

Attendance at school is crucial to improving educational outcomes for students. Unfortunately, children in out-of-home care face myriad challenges when it comes to attending school every day.
Josie Maralngurra touching her hand stencil made when she was around 12. In the background are three white barramundi fish figures with red line-work also created by her father Djimongurr. Photograph by Fiona McKeague, copyright Parks Australia

Friday essay: ‘this is our library’ – how to read the amazing archive of First Nations stories written on rock

Australia’s stunning galleries of rock art are vast repositories of knowledge that can teach us much.
Members of the Yoorrook Justice Commission. Provided by Porter Novelli

First Peoples in Victoria have a right to the truth about the impact of colonisation

Formal hearings of the Yoorrook Justice Commission have begun in Melbourne. This is the first Indigenous-led justice commission of this kind in the world.

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