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RMIT is a global university of technology and design. Founded in 1887, it is now the nation’s largest tertiary institution, with 82,000 students. RMIT has three Melbourne campuses, two campuses in Vietnam and a centre in Barcelona, Spain, and significant partnerships in Hong Kong, mainland China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore. RMIT is a leader in technology, design, global business, communication, global communities, health solutions and urban sustainable futures, and is ranked in the top 100 for engineering and technology in the 2010 QS World University Rankings.


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How much do alternative financial services aimed at people on low incomes contribute to their indebtedness? Image sourced from

Payday lending vacuum makes regulation difficult

Despite an emerging market in alternative financial services for people on low incomes, little is really known how these Australians manage their money.
Film festivals are not the only venues where the film industry produces all male panels. AAP/Javier Etxezarreta

The league of men: why are there so few female film critics?

Next time you're looking for a film to see at the cinema, take note of the reviews you're reading and who wrote them. How much is the gender and age of the author influencing what you see?
As regional television flounders, a new approach to deregulation is needed.

To save local voices we need a different kind of deregulation

The Save Our Voices campaign argues that existing media rules are "squeezing the life out of our regional TV networks". But the real story is more complex. Reform is necessary, but so too is local content.
It’s not the quantity but quality of jobs on offer to young people that deserves further attention. Image sourced from

Youth unemployment ‘crisis’ more about job quality

The current discussion about youth unemployment overlooks some nuances of the data that should be helping shape policy.
Federal governments have traditionally struggled to develop a coherent view for our cities. AAP Image/NewZulu/Thinking Media

Urban policy: could the federal government finally ‘get’ cities?

For the first time, both major parties have a cities portfolio in their front bench team. With a few more changes, the government could create a structure that will really get to grips with urban issues.
To bring arts policy into the 21st century, we need to update and correct the basic economic flaws that were baked into the mid-20th century model. Fabrik Bilder/Shutterstock

Leaving legacies behind: arts policy for the here and now

Turnbull’s 21st century vision for government provides an opportunity to fundamentally rethink arts and cultural policy from the ground up and move beyond its 20th century legacy.
The ills that afflict any society can be dealt with much more effectively when the arts are integrated into the national conversation. John Gollings/AAPONE

Finding our identity: arts policy and the future

What if Malcolm Turbull’s conception of "21st-century government" imagines a healthy civil society and a responsive economy that values debate, imagination, difference and surprise - all provided by the arts.
New Delhi’s Yamuna River, like much of India’s water, is polluted. The world urgently needs low-carbon ways to clean things up. EPA/Harish Tyagi

Let’s make sure that cleaning up the world’s water doesn’t send our climate targets down the gurgler

Much of the world still lacks access to proper sanitation and clean water - an issue that needs urgent action. But without low-carbon technologies, clean water could come at the expense of the climate.
If we have learned anything thus far it is this: one man’s excellence is another man’s mediocrity. AAP Image/Mick Tsikas

The Senate Inquiry into Arts Funding: a new live performance work

In live performance, when developing a new work and before getting to the final rehearsal period, previews and season, there is often a public showing. Enter the Senate Inquiry, stage left.
To the uninitiated, extreme metal can be an impenetrable wall of guitar-based noise. Florian Stangl. Picture of Morbid Angel.

The case for extreme metal

For many people, their knowledge of extreme metal mainly springs from the nefarious activities of a small group of Norwegian musicians in the 1990s. But there's more to this genre than meets the eye.

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