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San Diego State University

San Diego State University is a major public research institution that provides transformative experiences for its more than 36,000 students. SDSU offers bachelor’s degrees in 95 areas, master’s degrees in 78 areas and doctorates in 22 areas, as well as programs at regional microsites and around the globe. SDSU ranks as the number 1 California State University in federal research support, as one of the top public research Universities in California.

In addition to academic offerings at SDSU, SDSU Imperial Valley and SDSU Georgia, SDSU Global Campus offers online training, certificates and degrees in areas of study designed to meet the needs of students everywhere. Students participate in transformational research, international experiences, sustainability and entrepreneurship initiatives, internships and mentoring, and a broad range of student life and leadership opportunities.

SDSU is committed to inclusive excellence and known for its efforts advancing diversity and inclusion. SDSU is nationally recognized for its study abroad initiatives, veterans’ programs and support of LGBTQA+ students, as well as its powerhouse Division I Athletics Program. About 54% of SDSU’s undergraduate and graduate students are students of color.

SDSU is also a long-standing Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) and resides on Kumeyaay land. The university’s rich campus life and location offers opportunities for students to lead and engage with the creative and performing arts, career and internship opportunities with SDSU’s more than 400,000 living alumni, and the vibrant cultural life of the greater San Diego and U.S.- Mexico region.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 43 articles

Rhyming means something different in ASL than it does in spoken language. Zed Sevcikova Sehyr

An interactive visual database for American Sign Language reveals how signs are organized in the mind

In American Sign Language, some words rhyme, some look like what they mean and some are used more often than others. A new database of these features paves a pathway for ASL research.
A wall relief from the British Museum shows three scribes amid a military campaign of the Assyrian king Tiglath-pileser III, in Babylonia (Iraq). WikiCommons

3 reasons to study science communication beyond the West

All cultures have communicated their knowledge in diverse and marvellous ways throughout time. Failing to see the significance of this is racist and lazy.
An homage to Samuel Paty, a teacher murdered after showing caricatures of the Prophet Mohammed from the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, Oct. 18, 2020. Adnan Farzat/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Beheading in France could bolster president’s claim that Islam is in ‘crisis’ – but so is French secularism

Macron wants to 'build an Islam in France that can be compatible with the Enlightenment.' But that goal assumes France is compatible with Islam, says a Muslim scholar of religion and politics.
California was one of the first states to enact shelter-in-place orders. Aydin Palabiyikoglu/Getty Images

California’s early shelter-in-place order may have saved 1,600 lives in one month

Four researchers studied California's shelter-in-place orders to figure out how many lives were saved by its early enactment. Here's what they found.
Released prisoners sit in a bus outside Ankara, Turkey – while government critics remain behind bars due to Turkey’s sweeping terror laws. AP

Turkey releasing murderers – but not political opponents – from prison amid coronavirus pandemic

To stem the spread of COVID-19, Turkey is releasing 90,000 prison inmates. Not on the list for release: tens of thousands of academics, journalists and others the regime sees as political threats.
A pedestrian wearing a protective face mask walks past a nearly empty restaurant in New York City. John Minchillo/AP Photo

The coronavirus could be Generation Z’s 9/11

We don't know how long-lasting the effects of the virus will be, but the outbreak is already having a deep psychological impact on people and disrupting life on a massive scale.
Des islamistes pakistanais protestent contre la clémence de la Cour suprême à l'égard d'Asia Bibi, une chrétienne pakistanaise accusée de blasphème, à Karachi, le 1er février 2019. Asif Hassan/AFP via Getty Images

Pourquoi le blasphème est-il passible de la peine capitale dans certains pays musulmans ?

Au Pakistan, en Iran et en Arabie saoudite, le blasphème est passible de la peine de mort. Ces lois n’ont pas seulement des motifs religieux : elles répondent aussi à des préoccupations politiques.
Pakistani Islamists march to protest the Supreme Court lenient treatment of Asia Bibi, a Christian Pakistani woman accused of blasphemy, in Karachi, Feb. 1, 2019. ASIF HASSAN/AFP via Getty Images

Execution for a Facebook post? Why blasphemy is a capital offense in some Muslim countries

Pakistan, Iran and Saudi Arabia all punish blasphemy harshly – even with death. Such laws have political as well as religious motives, says a scholar on Islamism: They're a tool for crushing dissent.
Mohammed Morsi, elit Ikhwanul Muslimin menjadi Presiden Mesir pertama yang dipilih secara demokratis.. Kemudian lengser pada 2013 dan meninggal dalam status terpidana pada Juni lalu. Reuters/Amr Dalsh

Riset tunjukkan penyebab jatuhnya Ikhwanul Muslimin di Mesir dan gerakan Gulen di Turki begitu cepat

Beberapa tahun yang lalu, Ikhwanul Muslimin di Mesir dan gerakan Gulen di Turki memiliki kekuatan untuk merealisasikan idealisme mereka. Bagaimana bisa mereka jatuh begitu cepat?
Mohammed Morsi, a member of the controversial Islamist political organization the Muslim Brotherhood, was Egypt’s first democratically elected president. He was overthrown in a coup in 2013 and died on trial this June. Reuters/Amr Dalsh

How two Islamic groups fell from power to persecution: Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood and Turkey’s Gulenists

A few years ago, Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood and Turkey's Gulenists were running the show. Now both religious movements face political repression. How did they fall so far, so fast?
A worker marks timber logs at a concession area in Sarawak, Malaysia. Rainforest logging in Asia feeds much of the world’s thirst for timber. AP Photo/Vincent Thian

How to keep conservation policies from backfiring in a globally connected world

In a global economy, passing laws to conserve forests, fisheries or other natural resources can simply shift demand for those goods to other countries or regions where they aren't as well protected.

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