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San Diego State University

San Diego State University is a major public research institution that provides transformative experiences for its more than 36,000 students. SDSU offers bachelor’s degrees in 95 areas, master’s degrees in 78 areas and doctorates in 22 areas, as well as programs at regional microsites and around the globe. SDSU ranks as the number 1 California State University in federal research support, as one of the top public research Universities in California.

In addition to academic offerings at SDSU, SDSU Imperial Valley and SDSU Georgia, SDSU Global Campus offers online training, certificates and degrees in areas of study designed to meet the needs of students everywhere. Students participate in transformational research, international experiences, sustainability and entrepreneurship initiatives, internships and mentoring, and a broad range of student life and leadership opportunities.

SDSU is committed to inclusive excellence and known for its efforts advancing diversity and inclusion. SDSU is nationally recognized for its study abroad initiatives, veterans’ programs and support of LGBTQA+ students, as well as its powerhouse Division I Athletics Program. About 54% of SDSU’s undergraduate and graduate students are students of color.

SDSU is also a long-standing Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) and resides on Kumeyaay land. The university’s rich campus life and location offers opportunities for students to lead and engage with the creative and performing arts, career and internship opportunities with SDSU’s more than 400,000 living alumni, and the vibrant cultural life of the greater San Diego and U.S.- Mexico region.

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Displaying 61 - 80 of 92 articles

A pedestrian wearing a protective face mask walks past a nearly empty restaurant in New York City. John Minchillo/AP Photo

The coronavirus could be Generation Z’s 9/11

We don’t know how long-lasting the effects of the virus will be, but the outbreak is already having a deep psychological impact on people and disrupting life on a massive scale.
Des islamistes pakistanais protestent contre la clémence de la Cour suprême à l'égard d'Asia Bibi, une chrétienne pakistanaise accusée de blasphème, à Karachi, le 1er février 2019. Asif Hassan/AFP via Getty Images

Pourquoi le blasphème est-il passible de la peine capitale dans certains pays musulmans ?

Au Pakistan, en Iran et en Arabie saoudite, le blasphème est passible de la peine de mort. Ces lois n’ont pas seulement des motifs religieux : elles répondent aussi à des préoccupations politiques.
Pakistani Islamists march to protest the Supreme Court lenient treatment of Asia Bibi, a Christian Pakistani woman accused of blasphemy, in Karachi, Feb. 1, 2019. ASIF HASSAN/AFP via Getty Images

Execution for a Facebook post? Why blasphemy is a capital offense in some Muslim countries

Pakistan, Iran and Saudi Arabia all punish blasphemy harshly – even with death. Such laws have political as well as religious motives, says a scholar on Islamism: They’re a tool for crushing dissent.
Mohammed Morsi, elit Ikhwanul Muslimin menjadi Presiden Mesir pertama yang dipilih secara demokratis.. Kemudian lengser pada 2013 dan meninggal dalam status terpidana pada Juni lalu. Reuters/Amr Dalsh

Riset tunjukkan penyebab jatuhnya Ikhwanul Muslimin di Mesir dan gerakan Gulen di Turki begitu cepat

Beberapa tahun yang lalu, Ikhwanul Muslimin di Mesir dan gerakan Gulen di Turki memiliki kekuatan untuk merealisasikan idealisme mereka. Bagaimana bisa mereka jatuh begitu cepat?
Mohammed Morsi, a member of the controversial Islamist political organization the Muslim Brotherhood, was Egypt’s first democratically elected president. He was overthrown in a coup in 2013 and died on trial this June. Reuters/Amr Dalsh

How two Islamic groups fell from power to persecution: Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood and Turkey’s Gulenists

A few years ago, Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood and Turkey’s Gulenists were running the show. Now both religious movements face political repression. How did they fall so far, so fast?
A worker marks timber logs at a concession area in Sarawak, Malaysia. Rainforest logging in Asia feeds much of the world’s thirst for timber. AP Photo/Vincent Thian

How to keep conservation policies from backfiring in a globally connected world

In a global economy, passing laws to conserve forests, fisheries or other natural resources can simply shift demand for those goods to other countries or regions where they aren’t as well protected.
Sleep deprivation among teens spiked after 2012 – just as smartphone use became common. GCapture/Shutterstock.com

Worry over kids’ excessive smartphone use is more justified than ever before

Some say the hysteria over screen time echoes parents’ worries that their kids were watching too much TV in the 1980s. But new studies show there’s nothing overblown about parents’ growing concern.
In the 1960s, the Temple established nine residential care facilities for the elderly and six homes for foster children in the Redwood Valley. Peoples Temple / Jonestown Gallery/flickr

Before the tragedy at Jonestown, the people of Peoples Temple had a dream

Throughout the movement’s history, African Americans and whites lived, worked and protested side-by-side. It was one of the few long-term experiments in American interracial communalism.
SAT reading scores in 2016 were the lowest they’ve ever been. Aha-Soft/Shutterstock.com

Why it matters that teens are reading less

In 1980, 60 percent of 12th graders said they read a book, newspaper or magazine every day for pleasure. By 2016, only 16 percent did.
We’ll say someone’s brainwashed only when we disagree with their beliefs or actions. lolloj/Shutterstock.com

The brainwashing myth

Forty years ago, Rebecca Moore’s two sisters helped plan the Jonestown massacre. But she refuses to say they were brainwashed, arguing that it prevents us from truly understanding their behavior.
Although measures of teen and adult happiness dropped during the high unemployment rates of the Great Recession, it didn’t rebound when the economy started to improve. ASDF_MEDIA/Shutterstock.com

What might explain the unhappiness epidemic?

Changes in how we’re spending our free time is a likely culprit.
Kids shouldn’t be expected to self-regulate the amount of time they spend on the device. And parents are finding it tougher and tougher to impose limits. Vitalinka/Shutterstock.com

Does Apple have an obligation to make the iPhone safer for kids?

The problem isn’t kids owning smartphones. But when daily use exceeds two hours a day, mental health issues start to crop up.

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