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University of Aberdeen

The University of Aberdeen is today at the forefront of teaching, learning and discovery, as it has been since its founding in the year 1495. This ambitious, research-intensive university attracts outstanding academics from the world’s most prestigious centres of learning, and a multinational student community taking advantage of courses, facilities, opportunities, and a unique student experience designed for the needs of the twenty-first century.

Through over 500 years the University of Aberdeen has developed a strong national and international reputation for its academic strength. Aberdeen academics and alumni have pioneered many developments in medicine, science, social sciences and humanities. Five Nobel Laureates are associated with the University.

The University’s research profile is grounded on a broad-based platform across a wide range of disciplines. The aim is to make a difference to both the world of knowledge and knowledge of the world. In all research areas, the University engages with policy, industry and public audiences to encourage and inform public debate, and stimulate interdisciplinary, joined-up action to address the big issues and questions facing today’s global community.

The University has identified four priority interdisciplinary research themes: Energy, Environment and Food Security, Pathways to a Healthy Life, and The North. All build on areas of current research excellence, and bring together academics in different specialties to contribute their own perspective and expertise to a topical world problem.

See www.abdn.ac.uk for:

  • the latest news from the University and its researchers
  • more about research themes and wider research activity
  • events including festivals, lectures, community cafes, exhibitions and concerts
  • new undergraduate and postgraduate programmes and opportunities for professional development

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 387 articles

Access to clean water is essential in preventing a number of infections. Riccardo Mayer/shutterstock

Community dialogue can show the way to meeting water needs: a South African case

Evidence suggests that involving marginalised communities in setting priorities and designing collective action can lead to improved health outcomes.
Patriarch Kirill, head of the Russian Orthodox Church, takes part in a service at Vladimirskaya Gorka in Kyiv in July 2012, part of anniversary celebrations of the christening of the country known as Kyivan Rus by its grand prince Vladimir I in 988AD. Reuters/Alamy

The Russian victim myth: here’s the history behind it

Vladamir Putin’s version of Russian history portrays his country as a victim – a historian examines the evidence.
A spring in his step? Uwe Deffner/Alamy Stock Photo

Spring statement 2022: quick analysis about standard of living, energy crisis and more – from experts

The government knows 2022 is going to be tough for voters.
Several lawmakers from high-tax states like New York are pushing for changes to a key tax deduction in Democrats’ $3.5 trillion spending package. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Some rich people will love at least one sweetener in Democrats’ $3.5 trillion plan

The 2017 tax cuts put a $10,000 cap on the deduction for state and local taxes. The richest households would see the biggest gains from eliminating or raising the cap.
A typical limestone karst landscape in China. Tony V3112/Shutterstock

How special soil observatories in China are helping to create more sustainable agriculture

Soil degradation is a huge challenge for farmers around the world. But new research is showing how farmers can balance crop yields with protecting the environment.
Port Soy Harbour in the Grampian region of Scotland which, along with the Highlands, has a high rate of Huntington’s, partly due to ancestral susceptibility to the disease. Helen Hotson/Shutterstock

Huntington’s disease: northern Scotland has one of world’s highest rates and rising sharply – here’s why

Better awareness of the disease has led to more testing, but there is also an ancestral element to explaining its proliferation in the UK’s far north.

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