Menu Close

University of Lethbridge

Links

Displaying all articles

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs Chrystia Freeland have relied heavily on the science-based advice of Chief Medical Officer Theresa Tam during the coronavirus pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Politicians and scientists need strong connections during the coronavirus crisis — and beyond

The effective integration of science into policy-making improves legislation and leads to effective solutions for society — and not only during times of crisis like the coronavirus pandemic.
La ministre de la Santé, Patty Hajdu, en compagnie de l'administratrice en chef de l'Agence de la santé publique du Canada, Theresa Tam, et du premier ministre Justin Trudeau, lors d'une conférence de presse sur le coronavirus qui s'est tenue à Ottawa, le 11 mars. La Presse Canadienne/Adrian Wyld

De l'importance des relations entre politiciens et scientifiques

Que l’on soit ou non en situation de crise, l’intégration efficace de la science dans la prise de décisions politiques améliore les projets de loi et mène à des solutions efficaces pour la société.
A Congolese family approaches the unofficial border crossing with Canada while walking down Roxham Road in Champlain, N.Y., in August 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Charles Krupa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Charles Krupa

Refugee stories reveal anxieties about the Canada-U.S. border

Canadian leaders have desperately tried to preserve the country's image of liberal humanitarianism at our border, but the reality is Canada's immigration history is built upon exclusion.
Canada’s mission in Afghanistan under former prime minister Stephen Harper is an example of how a minority situation for a government can influence foreign policy. Harper is seen here in Kandahar in May 2011, shortly after winning a majority government. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

How minority governments can influence foreign policy

Minority parliaments create a political environment that discourages cabinet from bold acts. That means Justin Trudeau's foreign policy will like be more risk-averse that it was before.
Students stage a walkout to raise awareness about systemic discrimination in the Canadian justice system during a protest at the University of Victoria in Victoria, B.C., on March 14, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

What does ‘We are all treaty people’ mean, and who speaks for Indigenous students on campus?

As students and faculty start a new academic year, it's a good time to highlight the barriers to Indigenizing the campus and the importance of Indigenous voices on campus.
Maps can be a tool in the defense of Indigenous communities against extractive industries. Canadian Centre for Architecture; Grant Tigner, painter. Seagrams Limited, publisher. The St. Lawrence Seaway and Power Project, in The St. Lawrence Seaway: The Realization of a Mighty Dream, 1954.

Using maps as a weapon to resist extractive industries on Indigenous territories

Historically, western corporate maps have been privileged over Indigenous ones. But given the essential debate of territory in resource conflicts, maps are a crucial tool.
Preliminary research into the Chess for Life Program in Alberta, Canada, shows that youth who are sentenced to chess instruction after committing non-violent crimes are learning useful life skills. (Shutterstock)

Judges sentence youth offenders to chess, with promising results

In Alberta, an alternative initiative sees youth who commit non-violent crimes sentenced to 25 hours of chess instruction with a University of Lethbridge professor.
A Reconciliation Pole is raised at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, B.C., in April 2017. The 17-metre red cedar pole tells the story of the time before, during and after the Indian residential school system. Thousands of copper nails representing thousands of Indigenous children who died in Canada’s residential schools were hammered into the pole by survivors, affected families, school children and others. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

If ‘indigenizing’ education feels this good, we aren’t doing it right

Calls to "indigenize" universities must start with listening - to Indigenous scholars and nations. And real reparation will be painful for settlers, for it will be unsettling.

Authors

More Authors