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University of Massachusetts Lowell

The University of Massachusetts Lowell (also known as UMass Lowell or UML) is an urban public research university in Lowell, Massachusetts, United States, and part of the University of Massachusetts system.

With more than 1,100 faculty members and nearly 17,000 students, it is the largest university in the Merrimack Valley and the second-largest public institution in the state behind UMass Amherst.

The university offers 120 bachelor’s, 39 master’s and 33 doctoral degree programs, including nationally recognised programs in science, engineering and technology. Academically, UMass Lowell is organised into six schools and colleges: College of Fine Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences; College of Health Sciences; College of Sciences; the Francis College of Engineering; the Graduate School of Education; and the Manning School of Business.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 67 articles

People gather outside the U.S. Supreme Court building as news spread of Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Sept. 18 death. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

3 ways a 6-3 Supreme Court would be different

A 6-3 conservative court will hear a broader range of controversial cases, shift interpretations of individual rights and put more pressure on local democracy to make policy decisions.
Sending in the feds to quell unrest often increases conflict on the ground, as it did this summer in Portland, Ore. Nathan Howard/Getty Images

Federal agents sent to Kenosha, but history shows militarized policing in cities can escalate violence and trigger conflict

Kenosha is the latest US city to see federal agents patrolling its protests. History suggests that supplanting the local police with a militarized national force rarely works out well.
Voters in Nashville, Tennessee, faced long lines in March 2020. AP Photo/Mark Humphrey

The right to vote is not in the Constitution

The framers of the Constitution never mentioned a right to vote. They didn't forget. They intentionally left it out.
On Dec. 19, 2016, Colorado elector Micheal Baca, in T-shirt second from left, cast his electoral ballot for John Kasich, though Hillary Clinton had won his state’s popular vote. AP Photo/Brennan Linsley

Supreme Court reforms, strengthens Electoral College

Electors may not vote their consciences, which means the Electoral College will continue to operate how most Americans think it does.
When blocking a highway, who is a domestic terrorist and who is a peaceful protester? And does it make a legal difference? David Ryder/Getty Images

The ‘domestic terrorist’ designation won’t stop extremism

Legally designating domestic extremist groups as terrorist organizations – as some in the US advocate now – will have limited benefits, if any at all.
On Dec. 19, 2016, Colorado elector Micheal Baca, in T-shirt second from left, cast his electoral ballot for John Kasich, though Hillary Clinton had won his state’s popular vote. AP Photo/Brennan Linsley

Supreme Court to decide the future of the Electoral College

Many Americans are surprised to learn that Electoral College members do not necessarily have to pick the candidate their state's voters favored. Or do they?
Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser presenting via telephone during oral argument before the Supreme Court on May 13, 2020 in Denver, Colorado. RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Supreme Court phoning it in means better arguments, more public engagement

The Supreme Court's pandemic-related move to oral argument over the telephone has improved those arguments and allowed the public to engage with these discussions of the meaning of our Constitution.
An artist’s conception of WASP-18b, a giant exoplanet that orbits very close to its star. X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/I.Pillitteri et al; Optical: DSS

A real-life deluminator for spotting exoplanets by reflected starlight

Sometimes it is difficult to take a photograph of an exoplanet because the star illuminating it is too bright. Now there is a new 'deluminator' telescope that can block out the extra light.
Clouds of smoke from burning cars mark the skyline of Culiacan, Mexico, during a 12-hour siege by the Sinaloa Cartel, Oct. 17, 2019. AP Photo/Hector Parra

Cartel sieges leave Mexicans wondering if criminals run the country

A series of brazen, highly visible attacks by Mexican drug cartels have killed at least 50 people in the past month, terrorizing citizens and making the government look weak on crime.
When faced with a wildfire, responders must act quickly and decisively to save lives. AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

Making life-or-death decisions is very hard – here’s how we’ve taught people to do it better

Emergency responders and military personnel need to think creatively – even imaginatively – to save lives under pressure. Analyzing the Grenfell Tower Fire in London reveals useful lessons.
Il existe aujourd'hui des applis spécifiques pour les parents qui veulent surveiller la position GPS de leurs enfants. Shutterstock

Pister son enfant avec une appli, une fausse bonne idée

Installer une appli sur le smartphone de son enfant pour suivre ses trajets, est-ce une parade contre les dangers de la rue ? Ou une intrusion dans sa vie privée qui peut nuire aux liens familiaux ?

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