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University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the nation’s first public university, is a global higher education leader known for innovative teaching, research and public service. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, Carolina regularly ranks as the best value for academic quality in U.S. public higher education. Now in its third century, the University offers 77 bachelor’s, 111 master’s, 65 doctorate and seven professional degree programs through 14 schools and the College of Arts and Sciences. Every day, faculty, staff and students shape their teaching, research and public service to meet North Carolina’s most pressing needs in every region and all 100 counties. Carolina’s nearly 330,000 alumni live in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 149 countries. More than 169,00 live in North Carolina.

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Viral surveillance and prediction may be key parts of figuring out what goes into a vaccine. Pexels Cover/500px via Getty Images

Future COVID-19 booster shots will likely need fresh formulations as new coronavirus variants of concern continue to emerge

A new generation of vaccines and boosters against SARS-CoV-2 may take a page from the anti-influenza playbook, with shots periodically tailored to target the most commonly circulating virus strains.
Experts estimate that close to 90% of the U.S. population must be vaccinated to reach herd immunity for COVID-19. David McNew/AFP via Getty Images

What is herd immunity? A public health expert and a medical laboratory scientist explain

Vaccination campaigns like the ones that eventually eliminated polio and measles in the United States required decades of education and awareness in order to achieve herd immunity in the U.S. population.
A portion of a map that erases the borders Colonial powers drew, and shows instead the Indigenous territories, treaties and languages of North America. Native Land Digital

Land acknowledgments meant to honor Indigenous people too often do the opposite – erasing American Indians and sanitizing history instead

Land acknowledgments state that activities are taking place on land previously owned by Indigenous peoples. They’re popular – but they may harm more than they heal, say three anthropologists.
A protest against racial injustice and police violence in Spain. Josep LAGO / AFP) (Photo by JOSEP LAGO/AFP

White privilege: what it is, what it means and why understanding it matters

A transnational movement for racial justice requires a sensitivity to the specific, local conditions in which race and racism touch the everyday lives of people.
In 2014, the Islamic State group could draw crowds of supporters, like these in Mosul, Iraq. But actual fighting recruits have been harder to come by. AP Photo

Al-Qaida, Islamic State group struggle for recruits

A second plot was planned on 9/11, but there were too few terrorists to carry it off. Twenty years later, al-Qaida and its offshoot the Islamic State group still have trouble attracting recruits.
Both Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson successfully rode to space on rockets made by their private companies Blue Origin and Virgin Galactic, respectively. AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez

Space travel for billionaires is the surprise topic with bipartisan American support – but not from Gen Z

According to a new poll, people across political and demographic lines think the private space race is good for the future but still just an ego trip for the billionaires involved.
As coronavirus cases surge, unvaccinated people are accounting for nearly all hospitalizations and deaths. Fat Camera/E+ via Getty Images

US is split between the vaccinated and unvaccinated – and deaths and hospitalizations reflect this divide

The US has split into “two Americas,” one of the unvaccinated and one of the vaccinated. The differences in deaths and hospitalizations between the two populations are striking.
Is COVID-19 hitting men harder than women? UpperCut Images/Getty Images

Why males may have a worse response to COVID-19

A new study is the first to identify sex differences in inflammation and immune cell activation in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection, which causes COVID-19.
Jeanette W. Jones holds the September 1957 issue of Ebony magazine, which features the article ‘Mystery People of Baltimore: Neither red, nor black, nor white. Strange ‘Indian’ tribe lives in world of its own.’ She is pictured at center, with her hand on her hip. Photo Sean Scheidt; author provided

Repatriating the archives: Lumbee scholars find their people and bring them home

Two Lumbee scholars who have mined local archives in search of tribal history raise the profound question: Who has the rights to memories and artifacts of their people’s past?
Hurricane Harvey set up a rare natural experiment to study the effects of fishing. NOAA via Wikipedia

When hurricanes temporarily halt fishing, marine food webs recover quickly

Hurricane Harvey destroyed the fishing infrastructure of Aransas Bay and reduced fishing by 80% over the following year. This removed humans from the trophic cascade and whole food webs changed.
Marx, Madison or God? Who said it first…or at all? Bettmann/Corbis/ Lucas Schifres via Getty Images

‘From each according to ability; to each according to need’ – tracing the biblical roots of socialism’s enduring slogan

At the height of Reaganism, close to half of Americans believed a phrase popularized by Karl Marx actually derived from the US Constitution. It doesn’t, but scholars have traced it to the Bible.

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