University of Ottawa

The University of Ottawa is the largest bilingual (English-French) university in the world. Located at the heart of Canada’s capital, we have ready access to the great institutions of our country. Our advances in social sciences, health, science and the humanities make uOttawa a unique place to learn, grow and excel.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 37 articles

China’s aspirations of global dominance will hit a snag given the world’s other major powers identify democratic values as central to their national identies. Only China and Russia do not. Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping in Beijing in June 2018. (AP Photo/Dake Kang)

The prospects for Chinese leadership in an age of upheaval

New research suggests the values and identities of the world's great powers present a major barrier to China's aspirations of global domination. Do not bet on China’s hegemonic prospects just yet.
Quebec theatre director Robert Lepage’s play SLĀV was cancelled in Montreal after accusations of racial insensitivity because it featured few Black actors. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

‘I don’t see race’ and other white lies

A recent controversy surrounding Québec director Robert Lepage has had some people claiming to be colour-blind when in comes to race. But nothing could be further from the truth.
A aerial view of Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain marine terminal, in Burnaby, B.C., is shown on Tues., May 29, 2018. (Jonathan Hayward/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Canada’s Paris-pipeline paradox

Canada wants to move towards a green economy and meet its Paris Agreement targets, but it has also just taken ownership of a pipeline. How can the federal government deal with this paradox?
Supporters of President Nicolás Maduro hold drawings of him and late President Hugo Chávez during a closing reelection campaign rally in Caracas, Venezuela, Thursday, May 17, 2018. (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

In Venezuela, to do research is to fight for civilization

As Venezuela's May 20 election approaches, scholars and students at the country's autonomous universities continue the fight for knowledge and freedom.
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg departs after testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., in April 2018 about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 presidential election and data privacy. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The hypodermic effect: How propaganda manipulates our emotions

Knowledge of our selves, quantified in big data and transformed into affective algorithms, is exploited by corporations and political parties to give us our 15 minutes of fame.
The province of Nova Scotia is leading the way in defining the terms of Canada’s ambiguous law on medically assisted dying. Here Liana Brittain is seen in Halifax in front of a projection of her late husband Paul B. Couvrette, who received a medically assisted death in P.E.I. on Sept. 15, 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan)

Can we die? The seriously ill need clarity

In Nova Scotia, it's clearer now who qualifies for medical assistance in dying. Will the other provinces and territories follow suit?
Research shows potential for delivering our drugs in ways that would make it harder for antibiotic resistance to evolve and spread. Here we see a close up view of a biofilm of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. (Shutterstock)

‘Drug sanctuaries’ offer hope for a post-antibiotic world

As a post-antibiotic future beckons, how can humanity protect itself against the proliferation of superbugs? Research suggests 'drug sanctuaries' in hospitals could be a promising solution.
Fitness apps can encourage people to throw out their own training plans and to instead, “race everyday.” (Shutterstock)

I’m a fitness app addict but I know they sabotage my workouts

Fitness apps which allow millions of users to virtually compete with each other can provide inspiration however, they may also be putting users in danger.
Canada’s minister of international development, Marie-Claude Bibeau, launches Canada’s new Feminist International Assistance Policy during an event in Ottawa in June 2017. Canada is set to announce a feminist foreign policy soon. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

The uneasy co-existence of arms exports and feminist foreign policy

Sweden has enacted what's known as a feminist foreign policy, and Canada plans on doing the same. One fly in the ointment is both countries' arms sales and how they're at odds with feminism.
Tuberculosis has been a problem for decades among Canada’s northern Indigenous population. New data obtained through access to information requests reveals shockingly high TB rates among Nunavut’s infants. Poor data collection indicates the real rates will be even higher. (Gar Lunney/Library and Archives Canada)

More than one in 100 Nunavut infants have TB

The TB epidemic is out of control in Canada's North. Eliminating the disease will require accurate data as well as government investment.
An obese Quebec man is seen in this photo. Canada is resisting U.S. attempts during NAFTA renegotiations to stop it from putting labels on processed foods to warn of their health risks. (Shutterstock)

How NAFTA will make us fat if the U.S. has its way

The U.S. is vehemently opposed to Canada's intention to put labels on unhealthy processed foods. Here's why Canada should continue to stand its ground during NAFTA renegotiations.
Tiana Schocko, from Peshawbestown, Mich., and of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa tribe, competes in the youth division of the 22nd Annual World Championship Hoop Dance Contest Sunday, Feb. 12, 2012, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Federal budget undermines Indigenous self-determination in sport programs

The federal government's 2018 budget allocates almost $50 million over five years to support sports programs for Indigenous peoples. The problem? The money is going to a non-Indigenous organization.
AI chatbots still struggle to understand the impact of their words. (Shutterstock)

Teaching chatbots how to do the right thing

The chatbot industry sees more data as the answer to building a truly conversational system. But the industry may be teaching chatbots the wrong thing.
A commonly cited statistic that 60 to 90 percent of gender dysphoric children grow up not to be transgender is based on studies that are deeply flawed. (Shutterstock)

Why ‘rapid-onset gender dysphoria’ is bad science

'Rapid-onset gender dysphoria' suggests children are being persuaded into transgender identities before they know what that means. This theory is best explained by transphobia and research study biases.
The Shape of Water offers a clever allegory to Donald’s Trump’s presidency, with Michael Shannon’s character (on the left) representing some of the president’s worst qualities. (Kerry Hayes/Fox Searchlight Pictures)

The Shape of Water: An allegorical critique of Trump

Not everyone can escape to the ocean's depths to avoid the Trump presidency, but we can escape to the movies. 'The Shape of Water' reminds audiences of the humanity of those who are marginalized.
There are widespread fears that so-called echo chambers and filter bubbles are leading to political polarization that poses a danger to democracy. But are the fears unfounded? (Melvin Sokolsky/1963 via Creative Commons)

The myth of the echo chamber

Despite fears that so-called echo chambers are causing political polarization, a new study suggests it's not the case.

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