University of Washington

Founded in 1861 by a private gift of 10 acres in what is now the heart of downtown Seattle, the UW is one of the oldest public universities on the West Coast.

The UW is a multi-campus university in Seattle, Tacoma and Bothell, as well as a world-class academic medical center.

We have 16 colleges and schools and offer 1,800 undergraduate courses each quarter. We confer more than 12,000 bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral and professional degrees annually.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 173 articles

Tiny Paley Park, surrounded by skyscrapers in New York City, introduced the concept of a ‘pocket park’ in dense urban centers. Aleksandr Zykov/Flickr

Parks help cities – but only if people use them

Research shows that access to urban green space makes people and neighborhoods healthier. But parks can't work their magic if their design ignores the needs of nearby communities.
Space debris in Earth orbit creates a dangerous obstacle course for satellites and astronauts. Dotted Yeti / Shutterstock.com

Why space debris cleanup might be a national security threat

Countries developing technology that removes or blasts away space junk may appear to be doing a public service. But those same technologies can destroy military and communications satellites.
A pod of narwhals (Monodon monoceros) in central Baffin Bay. Narwhals are the most vulnerable animals to increased ship traffic in the Arctic Ocean. Kristin Laidre/University of Washington

As Arctic ship traffic increases, narwhals and other unique animals are at risk

Climate change is shrinking Arctic sea ice and opening the region to ship traffic. Whales, seals and other marine mammals could be at risk unless nations adopt rules to protect them.
Healthy aging is a new norm, researchers say, with older adults having a new name and attitude. By YAKOBCHUK VIACHESLAV/Shutterstock.com

As life expectancies rise, so are expectations for healthy aging

The age of the US is increasing, and with it, new expectations of health and happiness. Is the US prepared for the wave of baby boomers who will live long and want to be as healthy as they do?

The Mother of All Demos

The Mother of All Demos.
In 1968 computers were the size of a room. But after the founding of Intel and the introduction of the mouse that year they would eventually fit in a pocket – and change the Silicon Valley forever.
Breast cancer type 1 (BRCA1) is a human tumor suppressor gene, found in all humans. Its protein, also called by the synonym BRCA1, is responsible for repairing DNA. ibreakstock/Shutterstock.com

Gene-editing technique CRISPR identifies dangerous breast cancer mutations

Mutations in BRCA genes are linked to the early onset of breast and ovarian cancers. But the effect of most mutations is unclear. Now new research can distinguish harmless from dangerous mutations.
What are the ethics of anonymous resistance? Vincent Diamante

Why the anonymous op-ed sets a dangerous precedent

An expert argues why the anonymous op-ed in The New York Times can hardly be considered an act of civil disobedience and why it might make things even worse in the Trump administration.
Story maps like this one can help policymakers better understand and respond to the needs of recently resettled refugees. S. Juneja

How ‘story maps’ redraw the world using people’s real-life experiences

From resettling Syrian refugees to mitigating climate change in Ecuador, interactive 'story maps' harvest communities' stories to help policymakers and neighbors better understand complex problems.
Un grupo de manifestantes, que se opone a que el gobierno de Estados Unidos construya un muro, sostienen un cartel que dice, ‘No al muro fronterizo’. AP Photo/Eric Gay

¿Para qué sirven las fronteras?

Los conflictos sobre la vigilancia de la frontera han estallado en gran parte del mundo. La respuesta de las personas depende de las diferentes visiones de qué es lo que las fronteras protegen.
A ‘no border wall’ sign is held during a rally to oppose the wall the US government wants to build. AP Photo/Eric Gay

What exactly is the point of the border?

Conflicts about policing the border have erupted in much of the world. How people respond depends on the many distinct visions of what borders are meant to be protecting.
A crowd gathers around speakers during a rally for free speech near the University of California, Berkeley campus. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

How free should speech on campus be?

On the one-year anniversary of the tragedy in Charlottesville, we asked the presidents of Bowdoin, Elon and the University of Washington whether free speech should be treated differently on campus.

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