Wesleyan University

Wesleyan University is known for the excellence of its academic and co-curricular programs. About 2,900 undergraduates—and some 200 graduate students—from around the world pursue their classroom studies, research projects, and co-curricular interests in ways that are demanding and intensely rewarding. Here, on a beautiful campus overlooking the Connecticut River, students learn to do productive and innovative work that makes a positive difference in the world—that’s what Wesleyan is about.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 26 articles

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev watch the action during the match between Russia and Saudi Arabia that opened the 2018 World Cup. Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP

One likely winner of the World Cup? Putin

The Russian leader seems to understand the ability of sport to foment feelings of national pride and enhance his popularity at home.
Abilify MyCite tracks whether patients are taking their medication. By kaprik/shutterstock.com

Digital mental health drug raises troubling questions

Digital health devices have become invaluable tools for improving human health. However, could a pill carrying an inbuilt sensor dehumanize patients, reducing them to a digital readout?
A homeless woman sits bundled against the cold in New York City, January 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar

Not just a place to live: From homelessness to citizenship

Solving homelessness doesn't just mean finding someone a physical home. A program run in New Haven, Connecticut, focuses on helping people see themselves as members of their communities – as citizens.
Moviegoers familiarize themselves with the joystick that will allow them to interact with the film ‘I’m Your Man’ during its premiere on Dec. 16, 1992. AP Photo/Richard Harbus

From Smell-O-Vision to Astrocolor, the film industry’s biggest innovation flops

Sound, color and special effects transformed the moviegoing experience. These inventions decidedly did not.
What does it mean when public figures say sorry? AP Photo/Paul Sancya

The art of the public apology

Public apologies are a type of performance before a larger audience, and they are to be understood in terms that are different from a private apology.
How many times do we wonder, ‘what’s the right thing to do’? Ed Yourdon from New York City, USA (Helping the homeless Uploaded by Gary Dee, via Wikimedia Commons

How should we decide what to do?

A scholar suggests a few approaches that have withstood the test of time.
Lucian Wintrich, left, leaves court on Dec. 11 after charges of breach of peace were dropped. In November, Wintrich had delivered a speech at the University of Connecticut titled ‘It’s OK To Be White.’ AP Photo/Jessica Hill

The dangerous belief that white people are under attack

A majority of white Americans now believe that white people experience racial discrimination, and memes like #ItsOkayToBeWhite are only fanning the flames.
Flooding in Port Arthur, Texas during Hurricane Harvey, Aug. 31, 2017. According to the Climate Science Special Report released on Nov. 2, heavy precipitation events are becoming more frequent and intense in most regions of the world. SC National Guard

The climate science report Trump hoped to ignore will resonate outside of Washington, DC

On Nov. 2 the White House posted a detailed climate science report without comment. The Trump administration is unlikely to heed it, but it could boost state, local and private sector action.
LGBT veterans march in a Boston parade. Contrary to what some may say, the military has a long history of embracing socially marginalized groups. AP Photo/Steven Senne

The military, minorities and social engineering: A long history

Whether it be African-Americans, Catholics or transgender people, the armed forces have played a vital role in shaping US social policy toward the country's minorities.
Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks to the students on July 21, 2017. Alexei Nikolsky/via AP

Imagining Russia post-Putin

Stepping back from the current crisis in US-Russia relations, a Soviet expert asks: what's in store for Russia in the long term, and is a peaceful transition possible when Putin's gig is up?

Research and Expert Database

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