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Articles on Aboriginal deaths in custody

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Here, where the Black Lives Matter movement has brought focus to First Nations people dying in custody, media attention has been episodic and too often absent. Provided by author

Australia’s news media play an important role reminding the country that Black lives still matter

George Floyd’s death and the US Black Lives Matter movement sparked extensive media attention. Why aren't Australian Indigenous deaths in custody getting the same amount of media coverage?
Indigenous women are insisting upon a broadening of policies that facilitate safety and justice for all women. James Ross/AAP

Carceral feminism and coercive control: when Indigenous women aren’t seen as ideal victims, witnesses or women

A documentary series aimed to spark national conversation about criminalising coercive control. However, it highlighted power imbalances in conversations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous women.
Many of the royal commission’s recommendations concerning families primarily regard the circumstances of their loved one’s death rather than inclusion in decision-making processes. Supplied by Latoya Aroha Rule

The families of Indigenous people who die in custody need a say in what happens next

The government continues to refuse collaboration with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families on addressing Aboriginal deaths in custody.
The Royal Commission recommends that all media organisations should be encouraged to develop codes and policies relating to the presentation of Aboriginal issues. Biance De Marchi/AAP

Not criminals or passive victims: media need to reframe their representation of Aboriginal deaths in custody

The Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody made recommendations to ensure ethical reporting of these deaths. Despite this, harmful and inaccurate reporting still abounds.

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