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Articles on Concussions

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Sleep plays a critically important role in the recovery process in the days following a concussion. nicolamargaret/E+ via Getty Images

Concussions can cause disruptions to everyday life in both the short and long term – a neurophysiologist explains what to watch for

While high-profile concussions in the NFL have brought renewed attention to the gravity of head injuries, they can also occur on the playground or during junior varsity practices – with lasting effects.
Over the past two decades, researchers have gained a great deal of insight into the risks surrounding concussions – some of which has led to sweeping policy changes. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images Sports via Getty Images

The risk of concussion lurks at the Super Bowl – and in all other sports

Millions of sports-related concussions occur in the US every year. Many of them happen to high school and college athletes.
Many long COVID-19 symptoms – such as fatigue, brain fog and memory impairment – are similar to those experienced post-concussion. Cavan Images/Cavan Collection via Getty Images

How to help kids with ‘long COVID’ thrive in school

When a student suffers a concussion, their school typically offers certain accommodations – lighter workload, rest breaks, more time to complete tests. Do kids with long COVID need the same?
Linebacker Luke Kuechly of the Carolina Panthers in a game against the Philadelphia Eagles in Philadelphia Oct. 21, 2018. Matt Rourke/AP Photo

Concussion prevention: Sorting through the science to see what’s sound

The sports world is understandably eager to prevent concussions, but some of the products on the market are not helping and may even hurt, by leading people to feel protected when they are not.
Brain damage linked to concussions in football can resemble that found in elderly and comatose patients but there may be ways to prevent it so the sport continues. Toronto Argonauts’ Jeffrey Finley, left, rushes to take down Calgary Stampeders’ quarterback Bo Levi Mitchell in this August file photo. ( THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh)

Grey Cup haunted by brain injury risk — but doesn’t have to be

Concussions in football and other contact sports correlate with severe, long-term brain damage — but science shows it doesn’t have to be that way.
There are benefits to sport participation, and it is important for parents to be aware of concussion risks, how to avoid them, and the signs when they may have occurred. (Shutterstock)

How to avoid, recognize and treat concussion in sports

As students return to school and prepare to join sports teams, here’s what they and their parents need to know about concussions.
Youngsters leave a football field in 2015 after playing at halftime at a game between the Buffalo Bills and the Carolina Panthers. AP Photo/Bill Wippert

Concussions and CTE: More complicated than even the experts know

A recent study that showed that 110 of 111 brains of deceased NFL players had a serious brain disease raised concerns once again about concussions. But there’s a lot we still need to know.
Michelle Vansickle, center, of Flowery Branch, Ga., during a youth football safety clinic March 18, 2014, in Alpharetta, Ga. AP Photo/Jason Getz

Concerned about concussions and brain injuries? 4 essential reads

A study of the brains of 111 NFL players after their deaths showed that 110 had degenerative brain disease. Here are some expert analyses of what can be done to stop brain injury from sports.
People with traumatic brain injuries, say after a car accident or an assault, can have behavioural problems long after their physical injuries have healed. from www.shutterstock.com

Explainer: what is traumatic brain injury?

Survivors of traumatic brain injuries might have behavioural issues or have problems holding down a job for years after a blow to the head or a bad fall.
Soccer player on artificial turf. From www.shutterstock.com

Why artificial turf may truly be bad for kids

Artificial turf has become popular for kids’ sports as well as for professional players. The little black crumbs that help support the blades of fake grass may not be so harmless.
Helmets like this that absorb impact are used in the NFL, but not in high school. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

Can headband sensors reduce underreported concussions in kids?

As many as half a million concussions in youth go unreported each year. Finding a way to measure whether a hit has occurred on the field is an important way to address these injuries.

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