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Articles on COVID-19 vaccines

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Pediatric emergency rooms in some states are at or over capacity due to the surging number of respiratory infections. GOLFX/iStock via Getty Images Plus

COVID-19, RSV and the flu are straining health care systems – two epidemiologists explain what the ‘triple threat’ means for children

Respiratory viruses are hitting young children and infants particularly hard this fall and winter season, and experts don’t yet know exactly why.
Media literacy can help you tell the difference between real and false news. Zbynek Pospisil/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Understanding how news works can short-circuit the connection between social media use and vaccine hesitancy

Researchers identified a connection between low levels of media literacy and COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in people who consume their news via social media.
A 10-year-old Toronto boy receives his COVID-19 vaccine shot from a Toronto Public Health nurse at a children’s vaccine clinic at Scotiabank Arena in December 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Adding COVID-19 to ‘designated diseases’ could boost vaccine uptake among children

Adding COVID-19 to a list of ‘designated diseases’ will not make vaccination mandatory for school entry. But it may help increase COVID-19 vaccine uptake among children.
As of August 2022, COVID-19 vaccination rates in Black and Hispanic people exceeded those of white Americans nationally, but only for the initial shots. FatCamera/E+ via Getty Images

Low vaccine booster rates are now a key factor in COVID-19 deaths – and racial disparities in booster rates persist

Early on, public health messaging focused on the need for vaccines to combat COVID-19. But far less attention has been given to the role of boosters in preventing deaths and reducing inequities.
COVID-19 patients receive oxygen as they lie in their beds in the intensive care unit of a hospital in Machakos, Kenya, in August 2021. (AP Photo/Brian Inganga)

Enduring colonialism has made it harder to end the COVID-19 pandemic

A major lesson from the COVID-19 pandemic is the need to decolonize transnational governance so that the world is better able to handle both future and current global crises.
Talking about vaccines with trusted health care providers and with family can help wade through the sea of information – and misinformation. Morsa Images/DigitalVison via Getty Images

Misinformation will be rampant when it comes to COVID-19 shots for young children – here’s what you can do to counter it

With COVID-19 shots finally available for infants and preschoolers, knowing how to combat misinformation on social media and elsewhere could be more important than ever.
With mask mandates and vaccine requirements lifting, public health information remains crucial so people can weigh their own COVID-19 risks. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Adapting to life with COVID-19: Lessons our own immune system can teach us about public health information

To help people make informed decisions about ongoing COVID-19 risks, public health messaging needs to adapt as the pandemic evolves, just as immune systems adapt to new viruses and variants.
Global Justice campaigners in London stand by fake coffins to highlight global COVID-19 deaths. If pharma companies waived intellectual property rights, it would be easier for low- and middle-income countries to access COVID-19 vaccines. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

We still need a vaccine patent waiver, but not the one on offer at the World Trade Organization meeting

Waiving patent rights on COVID-19 vaccines and drugs is still crucial to ensure access globally, but the waiver on the table at the June World Trade Organization meeting doesn’t do the job.
Inhaled vaccine delivery could take on not only COVID-19, but also other respiratory infections, including tuberculosis. (Shutterstock)

Inhaled vaccine for COVID-19: The pandemic accelerated decades of research leading to jab-free vaccine now in human testing

An inhaled COVID-19 vaccine would go directly to where the body would use it: the mucosal surface of the airways. This could mean less waste and more benefit, lower costs and reduced side-effects.

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