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Articles on COVID-19 vaccines

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Nanoparticles can help cancer drugs home in on tumors and avoid damaging healthy cells. Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library via Getty Images

Nanoparticles are the future of medicine – researchers are experimenting with new ways to design tiny particle treatments for cancer

The COVID-19 mRNA vaccines put nanomedicine in the spotlight as a potential way to treat diseases like cancer and HIV. While the field isn’t there yet, better design could help fulfill its promise.
While the vast majority of primary care providers have higher confidence in vaccines than the general public, some do not. Evgeniy Shkolenko/iStock via Getty Images Plus

The 1 in 10 U.S. doctors with reservations about vaccines could be undermining the fight against COVID-19

Many COVID-19 vaccination campaigns encourage doctors to serve as a trusted source of vaccine information. But certain vaccine-hesitant providers may stymie these efforts.
Millions of U.S. children ages 5-11 have already received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Keith Birmingham/MediaNews Group/Pasadena Star-News via Getty Images

COVID-19 vaccines for the youngest children may be inching closer to authorization – a pediatrician explains how they’re being tested

Moderna will ask the FDA to allow emergency use for its vaccine in children as young as 6 months, a step many parents have been anticipating.
B.C. Jobs Minister Ravi Kahlon has his COVID-19 vaccine QR code scanned in September, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Pandemic vaccine passports in Canada: A brief history and potential future

Vaccine passports became one of the most divisive issues of the COVID-19 pandemic. These policies were affected not only by public opinion but by new variants and changing goals for herd immunity.
A ground crew member directs the loading of a shipment of Cuba’s homegrown COVID-19 vaccines donated to Syria, on the tarmac of the Jose Marti International Airport, in Havana, on Jan. 7, 2022. (AP Photo / Ramon Espinosa)

Big Pharma vs. Little Cuba: Why Cubans trust vaccines and how they’re helping vaccinate the world

Cuba is acting on the scientific fact that humanity will be safest when all who can be vaccinated are vaccinated. It is following the science and earning its trusted reputation.
WHO Director-General, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, during a visit at Afrigen Formulation Facilities in Cape Town, South Africa. BENOIT DOPPAGNE/BELGA MAG/AFP/GettyImages

How drug companies are sidestepping the WHO’s technology transfer hub in Africa

Moves by Moderna and BioNTech to make vaccines themselves in African countries signal that the companies aren’t considering licensing its technology to a third party for local manufacture.
PM Scott Morrison after a National Security Committee meeting on March 1. Morrison later tested positive for COVID. Mick Tsikas/AAP Image

Scott Morrison has COVID. It’s a big deal but not how you think

Imagine if the PM had caught COVID two years ago? We knew so little about COVID with certainty back then, and what we did know was truly frightening. Here’s what’s changed since then.
Researchers are working to develop vaccines that provide long-term immune protection from COVID-19. Marko Geber/Digital Vision via Getty Images

How long does protective immunity against COVID-19 last after infection or vaccination? Two immunologists explain

Because COVID-19 is a relatively new virus, researchers still aren’t sure exactly how long vaccines and prior infections provide protection.
Reason is not the only factor that guides vaccine decisions. Understanding human decision-making is the first step in changing behaviour. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Vaccine hesitancy: Why ‘doing your own research’ doesn’t work, but reason alone won’t change minds

Vaccine hesitancy is often met with one of two responses: Ridicule, or factual information. Both assume a failure of reason, but human behaviour is more complex than reason, so both responses fail.

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