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Articles on Vaccines

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The American flag flies at half-staff at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on May 14, 2022, after President Biden ordered flags lowered to commemorate 1 million American dead due to COVID-19. AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

The role party affiliation played in getting US to grim new milestone of 1 million COVID deaths

Your willingness to get a vaccination is tied to your political party. And that may have deadly consequences.
Social media sites like Twitter have been a major source of both true and false information regarding COVID-19 vaccines. MicroStockHub/iStock via Getty Images

Countries with lower-than-expected vaccination rates show unusually negative attitudes to vaccines on Twitter

A team analyzed more than 21 million tweets about COVID-19 vaccines and found that negative sentiments on social media were tied to lower-than-expected vaccination rates in many nations.
Nanoparticles can help cancer drugs home in on tumors and avoid damaging healthy cells. Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library via Getty Images

Nanoparticles are the future of medicine – researchers are experimenting with new ways to design tiny particle treatments for cancer

The COVID-19 mRNA vaccines put nanomedicine in the spotlight as a potential way to treat diseases like cancer and HIV. While the field isn’t there yet, better design could help fulfill its promise.
Dozens of coronavirus vaccines are in clinical trials in the U.S. Joao Paulo Burini/Moment via Getty Images

Will new vaccines be better at fighting coronavirus variants? 5 questions answered

Existing coronavirus vaccines are not as effective against newer variants of the virus. Two vaccine experts explain how new vaccines currently in development will likely offer better protection.
While the vast majority of primary care providers have higher confidence in vaccines than the general public, some do not. Evgeniy Shkolenko/iStock via Getty Images Plus

The 1 in 10 U.S. doctors with reservations about vaccines could be undermining the fight against COVID-19

Many COVID-19 vaccination campaigns encourage doctors to serve as a trusted source of vaccine information. But certain vaccine-hesitant providers may stymie these efforts.
Millions of U.S. children ages 5-11 have already received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Keith Birmingham/MediaNews Group/Pasadena Star-News via Getty Images

COVID-19 vaccines for the youngest children may be inching closer to authorization – a pediatrician explains how they’re being tested

Moderna will ask the FDA to allow emergency use for its vaccine in children as young as 6 months, a step many parents have been anticipating.
A ground crew member directs the loading of a shipment of Cuba’s homegrown COVID-19 vaccines donated to Syria, on the tarmac of the Jose Marti International Airport, in Havana, on Jan. 7, 2022. (AP Photo / Ramon Espinosa)

Big Pharma vs. Little Cuba: Why Cubans trust vaccines and how they’re helping vaccinate the world

Cuba is acting on the scientific fact that humanity will be safest when all who can be vaccinated are vaccinated. It is following the science and earning its trusted reputation.
Vaccination has allowed people to be more social again with much less risk of serious illness, but less cautious behaviors put people at an increased risk of catching the virus. Sabrina Bracher / iStock via Getty Images Plus

If I am vaccinated and get COVID-19, what are my chances of dying? The answer is surprisingly hard to find

Calculating your risk of death or hospitalization if you are infected with the coronavirus requires good data – notably, the total number of infections in the US. Unfortunately, that data is fuzzy.
Reason is not the only factor that guides vaccine decisions. Understanding human decision-making is the first step in changing behaviour. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Vaccine hesitancy: Why ‘doing your own research’ doesn’t work, but reason alone won’t change minds

Vaccine hesitancy is often met with one of two responses: Ridicule, or factual information. Both assume a failure of reason, but human behaviour is more complex than reason, so both responses fail.

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