Articles on Vaccines

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View of blood collection tubes in a rack on the first day of a free COVID-19 antibody testing event at the Volusia County Fairgrounds, in DeLand, Florida. Paul Hennessy / Echoes WIre/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Why COVID-19 immunity passports may violate US law

Amazon and General Motors are among companies exploring ways to test employees for COVID-19 infection, but these measures may be against the law.
Moderna just released the results of a phase 1 trial for a COVID-19 vaccine. JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images

What the phase 1 trials of the first COVID-19 vaccine really mean

Results from phase 1 trials of a COVID-19 mRNA vaccine created a burst of optimism. But details the company failed to release suggest it is too early to speculate whether the vaccine is effective.
Emergency rooms across the country have seen sharp drops in the number of patients seeking care for problems other than COVID-19. AAron Ontiveroz/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

‘I thought I could wait this out’: Fearing coronavirus, patients delayed hospital visits, putting health and lives at risk

Delaying medical care comes at a cost, both human and financial. The patients some emergency rooms have been seeing are a lot sicker and more likely to need hospitalization.
Brazilian scientist working on a vaccine at the Immunology laboratory of the Heart Institute (Incor) of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Sao Paulo. Sebastiao Moreira/EPA

Coronavirus vaccine: reasons to be optimistic

We don't have vaccines for the Sars, Mers or the common cold. But that doesn't mean scientists won't crack it this time.
Visitors look at new anti-SARS outfits for medical workers on display Thursday Nov. 6, 2003 in Shanghai, China, as the country braced for a resurgence. The disease never made a comeback. AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko

The mysterious disappearance of the first SARS virus, and why we need a vaccine for the current one but didn’t for the other

COVID-19 and SARS are both deadly – but different. SARS symptoms were quick to appear, making it easier to contain. Because health officials were able to contain it, the virus died off.

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