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Articles on Electoral College

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Vice President Mike Pence reads the final electoral vote counts declaring Joe Biden the next U.S. president during a joint session of Congress at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 7, 2021. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

The Electoral Count Act of 1887 is showing its age – here’s how to help Congress certify a presidential election with more certainty

Concerned about problems in counting Electoral College votes that determine the next president, lawmakers are considering changes to the Electoral Count Act. What is the act, and what’s wrong with it?
Vice President Mike Pence says he ‘welcomes’ objections to Biden’s Electoral College win, but House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other House Democrats reject any such effort. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Why Trump’s Senate supporters can’t overturn Electoral College results they don’t like – here’s how the law actually works

The 1887 Electoral Count Act spells out the process for Congress to convene and review election results on Jan. 6, and it requires both the House and Senate to uphold any challenges to Biden’s win.
Until this year, people who wanted to live here had to win not just more votes than their opponents, but more state legislative districts too. Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Mississippi just got rid of its Electoral College-like election process

Since 1890, Mississippi has required candidates for statewide office to win not only more votes than opponents across the whole state, but also in every legislative district.
If the House of Representatives selects the president, each state would get a single vote – not one vote per House member. iStock/Getty

Congress could select the president in a disputed election

Judges are generally reluctant to decide elections, as the Supreme Court controversially did in 2000. As a result, Trump’s flurry of litigation could wind up throwing the election to the House.
A transcript from the Constitutional Convention records the official report creating the Electoral College. U.S. National Archives

Who invented the Electoral College?

Three approaches were debated during the Constitutional Convention – election by Congress, selection by state legislatures and a popular election, though that was restricted to white landowning men.
CHARLESTON, SC - OCTOBER 30: Jake Hannay casts his in-person absentee ballot at Seacoast Church West Ashley on October 30, 2020 in Charleston, South Carolina. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images North America/Getty Images Via AFP

US presidential election: the problem is majority voting, not the Electoral College

The majority voting system in the United States, as in virtually every country in the world, imperfectly reflects voter preferences and could once again benefit Donald Trump.
What happens when an election is contested? Gorilla Studio/Getty

A contested election: 6 essential reads

The presidential election outcome seems to be at least partially in dispute. Six scholars provide a history of contested elections in the US and explain what happens when the results are challenged.

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