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Articles on US elections

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‘Portrait of a Woman of the Hofer Family,’ Swabian artist, c. 1470, and a picture showing a fly on U.S. Vice-President Mike Pence during the Oct. 7 debate at University of Utah in Salt Lake City. (Wikimedia Commons/AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Mike Pence’s fly: From Renaissance portraits to Salvador Dalí, artists used flies to make a point about appearances

Flies have long held symbolic meaning in the history of art. In portraits made in Renaissance Europe, the presence of a fly symbolizes the transience of human life.
With its largely white and older workers, this poll site in Maine is typical of poll sites across the U.S. Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Poll workers on Election Day will be younger – and probably more diverse – due to COVID-19

An army of mostly older, white volunteers run America's voting sites. They're reluctant to work during a pandemic. So new recruits are signing up to run the polls, for better and for worse.
With rare exceptions, like the 2000 presidential election, the winning candidate usually declares victory on election night. But the win isn’t actually certified until January. ranklin McMahon/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images

Who formally declares the winner of the US presidential election?

No, it's not the TV news networks. The American election certification process is a lot more complicated than that.
A congressional staffer opens the boxes containing the Electoral College ballots in January 2017. Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

Electoral College benefits whiter states, study shows

With a Supreme Court ruling rejecting one of the founders' two reasons for creating the Electoral College, only one reason remains: racism.
On Dec. 19, 2016, Colorado elector Micheal Baca, in T-shirt second from left, cast his electoral ballot for John Kasich, though Hillary Clinton had won his state’s popular vote. AP Photo/Brennan Linsley

Supreme Court reforms, strengthens Electoral College

Electors may not vote their consciences, which means the Electoral College will continue to operate how most Americans think it does.
On Dec. 19, 2016, Colorado elector Micheal Baca, in T-shirt second from left, cast his electoral ballot for John Kasich, though Hillary Clinton had won his state’s popular vote. AP Photo/Brennan Linsley

Supreme Court to decide the future of the Electoral College

Many Americans are surprised to learn that Electoral College members do not necessarily have to pick the candidate their state's voters favored. Or do they?
Nevada’s six Democratic electors sign their official ballots in December 2016. AP Photo/Scott Sonner

What could replace the Electoral College?

There are many more ways to elect a president than the US method – and several alternatives beyond the popular vote.
President and Mrs. Roosevelt enjoying after-luncheon conversation with patients of the Warm Springs Foundation. Bettmann/Contributor via Getty Images

What FDR’s polio crusade teaches us about presidential leadership amid crisis

Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s personal battle with polio, and his steady hand while overseeing a national eradication campaign, highlights decisive leadership against a virus that terrified America.
Milwaukee voters wait in a social-distancing line, some wearing masks, before voting in the state’s spring elections on April 7. AP Photo/Morry Gash

Why the Supreme Court made Wisconsin vote during the coronavirus crisis

The Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts has reversed its decadeslong practice of protecting voters' rights and removing barriers to casting ballots.

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