Articles on Federal election 2019

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Most Australians have had enough of the opportunistic point-scoring that characterises politics today and want leaders who put the public interest first. Mick Tsikas/Lukas Coch/AAP

New research shows Australians lack faith in our political parties to provide real leadership

According to a new survey, nearly a third of Australians believe the Coalition shows no 'leadership for the public good'. Labor fared little better.
To start with each side offers a “lamington” (Low and Middle Income Tax offset), then the differences get serious. Shutterstock/Grattan Institute

Your income tax questions answered in three easy charts: Labor and Coalition proposals side by side

After some years the Coalition's proposals would cost $40 billion per year more than Labor's, but by then Labor will have probably cut tax further too.
The Coalition has produced tables showing it would be offering bigger tax cuts in 2024. Shutterstock

Election stays on tax and health battlegrounds

The government has set out the tax benefit people in particular occupations would get in the long term under its plan, while Labor has announced funding for pathology from its cancer package.
The numbers of buyers able to celebrate moving into their first home are still well down on pre-GFC levels – and low-income renters are faring even worse. fizkes/Shutterstock

On housing, there’s clear blue water between the main parties

Housing policy is a stark point of difference at this election. While the government took promising steps to set up social housing finance, it has yet to give any sign it will finish what it started.
The Coalition government has rejected the Uluru Statement’s call for an Indigenous voice to Parliament, just one of many disappointments for Indigenous peoples. Jeremy Ng/AAP

No matter who is elected, more work remains on women’s rights and Indigenous issues

Some of the Coalition government's initiatives on women and Indigenous issues have been more successful than others. Labor is promising much more.
Seen here with the Prime Minister, Karen Andrews is one of few recent ministers for science who has a university education in STEM. Mick Tsikas / AAP

STEM is worth investing in, but Australia’s major parties offer scant details on policy and funding

We've had ten federal ministers with titular responsibility for science since 2007 – five under the coalition and five under Labor. That variation and a lack of consistent vision has an impact.

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