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Articles on Green infrastructure

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Coal operations at one of South Africa’s coal-fired power plants. Industrial policy needs to envisage less reliance on carbon. Photo by Phill Magakoe /AFP via Getty Images)

Industrial policy options for southern Africa: scenarios set out possibilities and risks

The scenarios provide plausible and possible alternatives for futures of industrialisation. They also alert decision makers to desired and undesired development pathways.
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Cities could get more than 4°C hotter by 2100. To keep cool in Australia, we urgently need a national planning policy

Cities occupy just 3% of the Earth’s surface, yet more than half the world’s population live in urban environments. We need nation-wide plans to keep our cities cool so no one gets left behind.
An aerial picture of funerals taking place at a section of the Westpark cemetery in Johannesburg. Michelle Spatari/AFP via Getty Images

Cemetery design has to consider many sensitive issues: lessons from Johannesburg

Municipalities are now forced to identify new cemetery planning methods and models that are environmentally sensitive and consistent with diverse cultural practices, and facilitate social cohesion.
Investing in natural assets like ponds can help prevent cities from flooding — and save municipalities money. (Shutterstock)

How investing in green infrastructure can jump-start the post-coronavirus economy

Natural assets produce important city services and complement engineered infrastructure. Investing in natural assets can help protect our environment, reduce municipal service costs and create jobs.
Cities can prepare for climate change emergencies by adding green spaces to help manage stormwater, heat stress and air quality. (Shutterstock)

How cities can add accessible green space in a post-coronavirus world

The coronavirus pandemic has highlighted the lack of green space available to those living in urban areas. Cities must be managed as ecosystems to make them more liveable and resilient.
Allowing residents to remove trees within three metres of buildings or ‘ancillary structures’ could dramatically alter the green infrastructure of dense inner Sydney suburbs like Rozelle. Tom Casey/Shutterstock

Trees can add $50,000 value to a Sydney house, so you might want to put down that chainsaw

Greater urban density is making it harder to preserve, let alone increase, tree cover. It’s vital, then, to demonstrate the full value of green infrastructure for healthy liveable cities.

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