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Articles on Health equity

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Medical breakthroughs like the COVID-19 vaccines need to be matched with programs that tackle health inequality. John Cherry/Stringer via Getty

A medical moonshot would help fix inequality in American health care

Medical innovations paired with innovative programs to get them to Black, Indigenous and Hispanic Americans can help close the health inequality gap.
Gathering on the land: Indigenous ways of knowing can ensure that communities reclaim and promote health and healing. (Melody Morton-Ninomiya)

Indigenous community research partnerships can help address health inequities

Many researchers may lack resources to guide them in conducting research that is equitable, inclusive and respectful of diverse Indigenous knowledge, ethics, practice and research sovereignty.
Premier Scott Moe speaks after a media tour of the COVID-19 mass immunization clinic and drive-thru immunization space in Regina on Feb. 18, 2021. The province also has mobile immunization vehicles to distribute the vaccine to remote communities. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Michael Bell

Mass COVID-19 immunization: Ensuring equitable access to vaccination

One important metric by which we can measure the success of our public health system: Ensuring everyone has access to immunization in their community.
Minister of Justice David Lametti gives a thumbs up as he rises to vote in favour of a motion on Bill C-7, medical assistance in dying, in the House of Commons on Dec. 10, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

A dangerous path: Why expanding access to medical assistance in dying keeps us up at night

Expanding access to medical assistance in dying (MAID) to those not terminally ill puts vulnerable people at risk of feeling pressured into MAID, and doctors at risk of being forced to facilitate it.
A personal support worker with West Neighbourhood House’s Parkdale Assisted Living Program on her way to see a resident at Toronto’s May Robinson apartments seniors’ housing on April 17 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

COVID-19 outbreaks in long-term care highlight the urgent need for paid sick leave

One of the factors that has made COVID-19 so catastrophic in long-term care homes was lack of paid sick leave for low-wage workers.
Protesters in São Paulo declare ‘Black Lives Matter’ at a June 7 protest spurred by both U.S. anti-racist protests and the coronavirus’s heavy toll on black Brazilians. Marcello Zambrana/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

COVID-19 is deadlier for black Brazilians, a legacy of structural racism that dates back to slavery

In Brazil, black COVID-19 patients are dying at higher rates than white patients. Worse housing quality, working conditions and health care help to explain the pandemic’s racially disparate toll.
Emergency medical technicians bring a patient into Wyckoff Hospital in the Borough of Brooklyn on April 6, 2020 in New York. Bryna R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images.

Doctors can’t treat COVID-19 effectively without recognizing the social justice aspects of health

While African Americans account for about 14% of the US population, they have accounted for about 60% of deaths from the virus. Several physicians offer an idea they think could help.
Researchers are testing an equity-based model in emergency departments, mental health agencies and hospital units. (Shutterstock)

Equity in health care improves people’s health

When care is equity-oriented, patients report fewer depression and trauma symptoms, less chronic pain and improved quality of life.
Remote presence technology enables a medic to perform an ultrasound at the scene of accident. (University of Saskatchewan)

How robots are helping doctors save lives in the Canadian North

A remote medicine program in Saskatchewan allows acutely ill children and pregnant women to be treated by specialist doctors, without leaving their communities.
Some tropical diseases can be treated with very inexpensive daily treatments yet remain common. Avatar_023/Shutterstock.com

Why aren’t we curing the world’s most curable diseases?

A cure for many tropical diseases was discovered 30 years ago this month. The drug is donated by its manufacturer. Why are we still dealing with neglected tropical diseases?

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