Articles on Hepatitis B

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Around 5% of adults and 90% of babies who contract hepatitis B go on to have life-long infection that can only be managed with regular medication. Ronald Rampsch/Shutterstock

We have a vaccine for hepatitis B but here’s why we still need a cure

Babies in Australia have been vaccinated against hepatitis B since May 2000, but 240,000 Australians still live with the disease.
While hepatitis B can’t be cured in the same way hepatitis C can, effective treatment is available. From shutterstock.com

In contrast to Australia’s success with hepatitis C, our response to hepatitis B is lagging

Curing thousands of Australians with hepatitis C is one of the public health success stories of recent years. We can take lessons from this as we continue in the fight against hepatitis B.
A technician holds a blood sample that tested positive for the hepatitis B virus. Jarun Ontakrai/shutterstock.com

A rare instance when preventative screening is worth the dollar cost

A new analysis shows that the US health care system will save money in the long run by screening people born in Asia and Africa for the hepatitis B virus, which causes liver cancer and cirrhosis.
To reduce the incidence of hepatitis B in Canada and to reduce mother-to-child transmission, it is vital that we vaccinate all infants at birth. (Shutterstock)

Why all Canadian infants need a hepatitis B vaccination

To meet World Health Organization targets and reduce the rates of chronic hepatitis B infection among children, Canada should implement routine vaccination of all infants at birth.
Like so many Indigenous people in the NT, Dr G. Yunupingu had chronic hepatitis B since he was a child. DAN HIMBRECHTS/AAP

Dr G. Yunupingu’s legacy: it’s time to get rid of chronic hepatitis B in Indigenous Australia

Hepatitis B rates in Indigenous communities are ten times higher than the rest of Australia. Eliminating the infection from Indigenous Australia can make a significant contribution to closing the gap.
The most important blood borne viruses for human health are the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Why are only some viruses transmissible by blood and how are they actually spread?

Why is it only some viruses are transmissible by blood, and how does the virus actually move from person to person?
Rates of sexually transmissible infections among the Indigenous population are still much higher than the non-Indigenous population. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Sexually transmissible infections on the rise in Australia: a snapshot

The annual surveillance report of sexually transmissible infections and blood borne viruses in Australia has found notifications of sexually transmissible infections are on the rise in Australia.
The thing all five viruses have in common is they can cause mild to very severe liver damage. wk1003mike/Shutterstock

Explainer: the A, B, C, D and E of hepatitis

Hepatitis A, B, C, D and E are very different viruses. Hepatitis A is genetically closer to the common cold than it is to hepatitis B. Hepatitis C is closer to the virus that causes dengue fever.

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