Articles on Lead poisoning

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Warning signs in the Newark Health Department after the city learned that lead service lines to houses still were contaminating water. Seth Wenig/AP

How to address America’s lead crisis and provide safe drinking water for all

Newark is the latest US city to struggle with high lead levels in drinking water. Ending this public health crisis will require more money and enforcement, plus stricter water testing standards.
Two house painters in hazmat suits remove lead paint from an old house. Jamie Hooper/Shutterstock.com

Why lead is dangerous, and the damage it does

The Flint water crisis made the country aware of the dangers of lead. But why, exactly, is this element so toxic and what does it do to the body?
Brandon Fant, left, gets his blood tested for lead poison levels by Lashae Campbell at a clinic in Flint, Michigan. Jim Young/Reuters

How the Flint water crisis set students back

The children who suffered lead poisoning as a result of the Flint water crisis of 2014 are likely to struggle academically and socially as a result, an expert on treating lead-poisoned children argues.
Beauty is still understood as a process of ongoing work and maintenance. Shutterstock.com

Friday essay: toxic beauty, then and now

The history of dangerous cosmetics shows us the harms that women have suffered to meet expectations of what is beautiful.
A baby plays with blocks spelling out one of the most famous formulas in history. vchal/From www.shutterstock.com

Is lead in the US food supply decreasing our IQ?

A new report from the Environmental Defense Fund raises concerns about lead in our food supply. Here are some things you should consider.
A big data analysis indicates the focus on service line replacement may only go so far at fixing Flint’s water issues. George Thomas/flickr

How big data and algorithms are slashing the cost of fixing Flint’s water crisis

By tapping into diverse data sources in Flint, researchers can predict vulnerable homes and even have found that home water service lines may not be the biggest contributor to lead poisoning.
Virginia Tech students process water samples from homes in Flint. Flint Water Study/Facebook

We helped uncover a public health crisis in Flint, but learned there are costs to doing good science

Virginia Tech University engineering students blew the whistle on Flint, Michigan's toxic drinking water. Hailed as heroes, they've also learned that it isn't easy to do science for the public good.
Flint, Michigan residents couldn’t get answers about their water – so they did their own research. Laura Nawrocik

Can citizen science empower disenfranchised communities?

A new model of citizen-led science is emerging – as in the case of Flint, Michigan's poisoned water. Rather than simply supporting scientists, citizens ask their own questions and set the research agenda.

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