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Articles on Marine life

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75% of Australia’s marine protected areas are given only ‘partial’ protection. Here’s why that’s a problem

Partially protected areas don't have more wildlife than unprotected areas. They consume conservation resources and occupy space that could otherwise be allocated to more effective protection.
The radiodont Anomalocaris, with its large stalked eyes, is considered a top predator that swam in the oceans more than 500 million years ago. Katrina Kenny

Freaky ‘frankenprawns’: ancient deep sea monsters called radiodonts had incredible vision that likely drove an evolutionary arms race

Our study on weird ancient marine animals called radiodonts supports the idea that vision played a crucial role during the Cambrian Explosion, a rapid burst of evolution about 500 million years ago.
Jaime Bran/Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Scientists thought these seals evolved in the north. 3-million-year-old fossils from New Zealand suggest otherwise

This newly discovered ancient monk seal is challenging previous theories about how and where monachine seals evolved. It's the biggest breakthrough in seal evolution research in about 70 years.
Extreme flooding during Hurricane Maria in 2017 was hazardous for the Puerto Rican people. But a new study finds that it helped native fish populations rebound after years of drought. AP Photo/Alvin Baez

Caribbean fish love catastrophic hurricanes

Big storms with lots of flooding, like hurricanes Dorian and Maria, actually restore the Caribbean's delicate balance between native and nonnative fish species, new research finds.
Everything in an animal’s body is made out of cells. And these cells need chemicals, such as salt, in and around them to work properly. The chemical balance needs to be just right. Alyse & Remi/flickr

Curious Kids: how do sea creatures drink sea water and not get sick?

Some animals, such as ghost shrimps can even cope with water that is saltier than normal seawater. It's all down to evolution.
A school of juvenile bocaccio in the midwaters of Platform Gilda, Santa Barbara Channel, Calif. Scott Gietler

Retired oil rigs off the California coast could find new lives as artificial reefs

Californians love their coast and strongly oppose offshore drilling. Will they support converting old oil rigs to artificial reefs – a policy that benefits both marine life and oil companies?

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