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Avian cholera is a highly contagious disease that has produced rapid population loss in Northern common eiders. (Shutterstock)

How Arctic sea ducks develop herd immunity from avian cholera

We can learn about the spread of diseases through populations by studying naturally occurring instances of herd immunity. Avian cholera in the Canadian Arctic provides a useful case study.
Ships are framed by pieces of ice in Frobisher Bay in Iqaluit, Nunavut, in July 2019. Canada plans to ban the use of heavy oil on commercial vessels, which will have economic consequences in the Arctic. The Canadian Press / Sean Kilpatrick

Will Budget 2020 take the Canadian North seriously?

The next federal budget will be decisive for Canada’s North. Will the government put in the money to achieve its many priorities in the Arctic?
Healthy, full-term Inuit babies are not eligible for palivizumab even though they have four to 10 times the rate of hospital admission compared to “high-risk” infants. (Philippe Put/flickr)

Inuit infants need access to medication to prevent respiratory illness

A drug called palivizumab can keep babies infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) out of the hospital, but many Inuit babies, who have a higher risk of infection, are not getting it.
Indigenous knowledge is an essential asset in the adaptation to climate change. Image of a remote community in Nunavik, where resources are limited. (Mylène Ratelle)

Climate policy should reflect the resilience of northern Indigenous communities

Although marginalized from policy decisions, northern Indigenous communities have maintained and developed strong social networks to help them cope with climate change.
Cancer rates are rising among Inuit and critical oncology specialists and treatments are often located in urban centres, thousands of kilometres away from remote communities in Inuit Nunangat. (Alex Hizaka)

An Inuit approach to cancer care promotes self-determination and reconciliation

A ‘shared decision-making’ model enables collaboration with Indigenous communities within Canada’s health-care system - to respond to TRC Calls to Action and address rising cancer rates.
Tuberculosis has been a problem for decades among Canada’s northern Indigenous population. New data obtained through access to information requests reveals shockingly high TB rates among Nunavut’s infants. Poor data collection indicates the real rates will be even higher. (Gar Lunney/Library and Archives Canada)

More than one in 100 Nunavut infants have TB

The TB epidemic is out of control in Canada’s North. Eliminating the disease will require accurate data as well as government investment.
The relationship between Canada’s Aboriginal peoples and non-indigenous population has never been an equal one. AAP Image/Adam Gartrell

Canada’s progress shows indigenous reconciliation is a long-term process

The relationship between Canada’s Aboriginal peoples and non-indigenous population has never been an equal one, even though the 1982 national constitution recognises Aboriginal rights.

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