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Articles on Inuit

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An Indigenous flag flies in front of Parliament during the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, Sept. 30, 2021. To live up to the intentions of UNDRIP, Canada must work with Indigenous communities to change harmful laws. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

UNDRIP 15 years on: Genuine truth and reconciliation requires legislative reform

To fully implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Canada must engage in genuine and inclusive law reform.
Indigenous-led conservation economies have immense reconciliatory potential and need to be respectfully supported and engaged. (Sergey Pesterev/Unsplash)

Recognizing the transformational potential of Indigenous-led conservation economies

Indigenous-led conservation economies have immense reconciliatory potential and need to be respectfully supported and engaged in order to create a new shared and equitable economic system.
George River Caribou outside of Nain, Nunatsiavut, Labrador. (David Borish)

What the declining caribou populations — and total hunting ban — mean for Inuit communities in Labrador

Support for Inuit and other Indigenous-led strategies for conservation and community well-being must be prioritized.
Changes to search terms, through guidance from Indigenous communities and library experts, can align systems with everyday language, but can’t invalidate the terms people use to refer to themselves. (Shutterstock)

Libraries in the U.S. and Canada are changing how they refer to Indigenous Peoples

Beyond revamping misleading terminology, some library science scholars and Indigenous knowledge holders are looking at how to index library materials in ways that reflect Indigenous knowledge.
Men participate in a demonstration of rope making for dog teams, May 12, 2022, in Inukjuak, Que. The Canadian Press/Adrian Wyld

Building bridges between scientific and Indigenous knowledge

The DIALOG network forms a bridge between scientific and Indigenous knowledge. It renews the relationship between the university and the Indigenous world, which has for too long been one-sided.
Lorelei Williams, whose cousin Tanya Holyk was murdered by serial killer Robert Pickton and aunt Belinda Williams went missing in 1978, wears a t-shirt bearing their photographs at a National Inquiry event in Vancouver in 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

‘End the genocide’: Little action on MMIWG calls for justice in the 3 years since the national inquiry concluded

The government needs to implement its proposed action plan. The families of the missing and murdered put their trust in a federal inquiry process, but have yet to receive that justice.
Final approach on the air charter into the Voisey’s Bay mine, a fly-in/fly-out nickel, copper and cobalt mine located near Nain, Nunatsiavut, in northern Labrador. (Matthew Pike)

As mining activity expands in northern Labrador, COVID-19’s ‘new normal’ difficult to accept for Nunatsiavut Inuit communities

‘Living with COVID-19’ has much higher risks for Nunatsiavut Inuit communities than many other areas. Recognizing those risks is crucial as mining operations resume in Newfoundland and Labrador.
A woman examines a diamond she is in the process of cutting and polishing in Yellowknife, N.W.T. in a photo from 2003. (CP PHOTO/Bob Weber)

Diamond mines in the Northwest Territories are not a girl’s best friend

While marketing has made diamond rings a symbol of heteronormative happy endings, women from the Northwest Territories tell a different story about their experiences with the diamond mines.
Grey Owl was an original ‘pretendian,’ portraying himself as the the son of a Scottish man and Apache woman after moving to Canada in the early 1900s. (Canadian National Railways/Library and Archives Canada, e010861684)

Fraudulent claims of indigeneity: Indigenous nations are the identity experts

Those quick to call-out are often not clamouring for Indigenous nations’ jurisdiction over citizenship, nor are they demanding “pretendians” be held accountable to Indigenous nations.
In this episode, two Indigenous scientists offer a different theory of pollution — one that includes colonialism at its root. This understanding may help us make a better future. Here, logging activities in Australia. Matt Palmer/Unsplash

Why pollution is as much about colonialism as chemicals — Don’t Call Me Resilient transcript EP 11

Colonialism is manifested by the way pollution impacts the lives of Indigenous peoples in Canada. Two Indigenous environmental scientists discuss how they’ve overcome obstacles in their research.
For some Indigenous people, participating in Canadian elections continues the legitimacy of the Canadian state. (Shutterstock)

A vote for Canada or Indigenous Nationhood? The complexities of First Nations, Métis and Inuit participation in Canadian politics

Indigenous people who vote are reminding Canada of the nation-to-nation relationships that continue to exist and to bring change from within the very structure that has been used to erase them.
Jesse Popp is an Indigenous scholar who is regularly inundated with requests for input and assistance. Here she shares a few things you should consider before reaching out to an Indigenous scholar. (Jesse Popp)

Want to reach out to an Indigenous scholar? Awesome! But first, here are 10 things to consider

As people recognize the value in weaving together knowledge systems and move towards reconciliation, Indigenous Peoples are being increasingly approached.
At the beginning of the 12-day celebration of life ceremony, Elder Wendy Phillips performs a smudge. (Josh Lyon)

Who decides what’s essential? The importance of Indigenous ceremony during COVID-19

Was participating in ceremony despite pandemic restrictions an act of Indigenous resistance and resurgence and did it reflect reassertion of nationhood and self-determination?
Queen’s University professor Celeste Pedri-Spade says a basic first question to determine identity is: ‘Who is your grandmother?“ Here a group of Métis children and two women sitting on a large rock, Fort Chipewyan, Alberta, 1931. H. S. Spence, Canada. Department of Mines and Technical Surveys. Library and Archives Canada, PA-014406 /

Stolen identities: What does it mean to be Indigenous? Don’t Call Me Resilient Podcast EP 8 Transcript

Transcript for Don’t Call Me Resilient Podcast EP 8: Stolen identities: What does it mean to be Indigenous?

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