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Articles on Inuit

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Ships are framed by pieces of ice in Frobisher Bay in Iqaluit, Nunavut, in July 2019. Canada plans to ban the use of heavy oil on commercial vessels, which will have economic consequences in the Arctic. The Canadian Press / Sean Kilpatrick

Will Budget 2020 take the Canadian North seriously?

The next federal budget will be decisive for Canada's North. Will the government put in the money to achieve its many priorities in the Arctic?
Healthy, full-term Inuit babies are not eligible for palivizumab even though they have four to 10 times the rate of hospital admission compared to “high-risk” infants. (Philippe Put/flickr)

Inuit infants need access to medication to prevent respiratory illness

A drug called palivizumab can keep babies infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) out of the hospital, but many Inuit babies, who have a higher risk of infection, are not getting it.
Cancer rates are rising among Inuit and critical oncology specialists and treatments are often located in urban centres, thousands of kilometres away from remote communities in Inuit Nunangat. (Alex Hizaka)

An Inuit approach to cancer care promotes self-determination and reconciliation

A 'shared decision-making' model enables collaboration with Indigenous communities within Canada's health-care system - to respond to TRC Calls to Action and address rising cancer rates.
Land Protectors Jenelle Duval, Susan Oralik, Vicki Allen and Amelia Reimer (left to right) look on as Denise Cole beats the drum on the steps of the Confederation Building in St. John’s on Tuesday, Oct.25, 2016 during a Muskrat Falls demonstration. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Paul Daly

Muskrat Falls hydroelectric project poses risks for Canada that are being ignored

A $12.7 billion investment in hydroelectricity has put Canada's economic welfare and its moral credibility on the line.
A family of Ahiarmiut, including David Serkoak pictured behind his mother Mary Qahug Miki (centre) at Ennadai Lake in the mid-50s before the Canadian government forcefully relocation them.

Canada’s genocide: The case of the Ahiarmiut

Once we understand genocide as something that can take awhile, with victims dying of starvation and disease rather than outright murder, we can recognize the genocide of Indigenous peoples in Canada.
We are not doing a good job of communicating climate change. People have diverging interpretations of how climate change fits into their own stories. (Unsplash)

Why we should stop labelling people climate change deniers

We must recognize the complexity of perspectives on climate change if we want to confront it.
Addressing Canada’s health inequities through the health-care system will only take us so far. Real change will require listening to Indigenous stories, which teach about our relationships to one another as human beings, and between us and our four-legged, winged, finned, rooted and non-rooted relations. (Unsplash/jongsun lee)

Indigenous knowledge is the solution to Canada’s health inequities

To improve Indigenous health in Canada we need more Indigenous health professionals and more culturally competent health-care providers. We also need to listen properly to Indigenous stories.
Bernie Williams, right, a women’s advocate in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, embraces Carmen Paterson while testifying at the final day of hearings at the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, in Richmond, B.C., on April 8, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

Can we really teach ‘Indigenizing’ courses online?

University "Indigenization" efforts using Massive Open Online Courses promise to reach wide audiences. They also raise critical questions about how to embody Indigenous ways of knowing and relating.
Tuberculosis has been a problem for decades among Canada’s northern Indigenous population. New data obtained through access to information requests reveals shockingly high TB rates among Nunavut’s infants. Poor data collection indicates the real rates will be even higher. (Gar Lunney/Library and Archives Canada)

More than one in 100 Nunavut infants have TB

The TB epidemic is out of control in Canada's North. Eliminating the disease will require accurate data as well as government investment.
Cory Watson of the Edmonton Eskimos reacts to losing to the Calgary Stampeders in the CFL West Final on Sunday. The word Eskimo signals negative and archaic stereotypes and is considered by most Inuit to be a racial slur. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Edmonton Eskimos is a racial slur and it’s time to stop using it

The use of the word Eskimos for a Canadian football team needs to end. It signals negative stereotypes and is considered by most Inuit to be a racial slur.
Marine waters are an important source of food for Inuit. (Judith Slein/Flickr)

Latest rocket launch renews concerns over Inuit food security

The North Water Polynya, or Pikialasorsuaq, is a key ocean area for Arctic animals and for Inuit hunting and fishing. Rocket launches threaten to contaminate the area with harmful chemicals.
Community-led research in the Inuit community of Rigolet, Labrador, helped identify dirty water containers as a source of drinking water contamination.

Collaboration can help in the Indigenous water crisis

Can community-led research help address Canada's Indigenous water security issues? One project from the Inuit community of Rigolet in Labrador suggests it can.
Jerry Natanine, community leader and former mayor of Clyde River, at a news conference in Ottawa in July following the Supreme Court of Canada ruling that upheld Inuit treaty rights in the Arctic. His lawyer and co-author Nader Hasan stands behind him. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Lessons from Supreme Court decisions on Indigenous consultation

The Supreme Court of Canada's recent decisions on Clyde River and Chippewas contain key lessons to ensure that Indigenous rights are recognized and respected in the future.
A polar bear suns herself on an ice floe on Baffin Bay in Nunavut. (Shutterstock)

What comes next for Clyde River after Supreme Court victory?

The Inuit town of Clyde River has won a long battle to stop Arctic seismic testing. The Supreme Court ruled the Inuit weren't adequately consulted. What does that mean for future consultations?

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