Articles on Inuit

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A family of Ahiarmiut, including David Serkoak pictured behind his mother Mary Qahug Miki (centre) at Ennadai Lake in the mid-50s before the Canadian government forcefully relocation them.

Canada’s genocide: The case of the Ahiarmiut

Once we understand genocide as something that can take awhile, with victims dying of starvation and disease rather than outright murder, we can recognize the genocide of Indigenous peoples in Canada.
We are not doing a good job of communicating climate change. People have diverging interpretations of how climate change fits into their own stories. (Unsplash)

Why we should stop labelling people climate change deniers

We must recognize the complexity of perspectives on climate change if we want to confront it.
Addressing Canada’s health inequities through the health-care system will only take us so far. Real change will require listening to Indigenous stories, which teach about our relationships to one another as human beings, and between us and our four-legged, winged, finned, rooted and non-rooted relations. (Unsplash/jongsun lee)

Indigenous knowledge is the solution to Canada’s health inequities

To improve Indigenous health in Canada we need more Indigenous health professionals and more culturally competent health-care providers. We also need to listen properly to Indigenous stories.
Bernie Williams, right, a women’s advocate in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, embraces Carmen Paterson while testifying at the final day of hearings at the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, in Richmond, B.C., on April 8, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

Can we really teach ‘Indigenizing’ courses online?

University "Indigenization" efforts using Massive Open Online Courses promise to reach wide audiences. They also raise critical questions about how to embody Indigenous ways of knowing and relating.
Tuberculosis has been a problem for decades among Canada’s northern Indigenous population. New data obtained through access to information requests reveals shockingly high TB rates among Nunavut’s infants. Poor data collection indicates the real rates will be even higher. (Gar Lunney/Library and Archives Canada)

More than one in 100 Nunavut infants have TB

The TB epidemic is out of control in Canada's North. Eliminating the disease will require accurate data as well as government investment.
Cory Watson of the Edmonton Eskimos reacts to losing to the Calgary Stampeders in the CFL West Final on Sunday. The word Eskimo signals negative and archaic stereotypes and is considered by most Inuit to be a racial slur. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Edmonton Eskimos is a racial slur and it’s time to stop using it

The use of the word Eskimos for a Canadian football team needs to end. It signals negative stereotypes and is considered by most Inuit to be a racial slur.
Community-led research in the Inuit community of Rigolet, Labrador, helped identify dirty water containers as a source of drinking water contamination.

Collaboration can help in the Indigenous water crisis

Can community-led research help address Canada's Indigenous water security issues? One project from the Inuit community of Rigolet in Labrador suggests it can.
Jerry Natanine, community leader and former mayor of Clyde River, at a news conference in Ottawa in July following the Supreme Court of Canada ruling that upheld Inuit treaty rights in the Arctic. His lawyer and co-author Nader Hasan stands behind him. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Lessons from Supreme Court decisions on Indigenous consultation

The Supreme Court of Canada's recent decisions on Clyde River and Chippewas contain key lessons to ensure that Indigenous rights are recognized and respected in the future.
A polar bear suns herself on an ice floe on Baffin Bay in Nunavut. (Shutterstock)

What comes next for Clyde River after Supreme Court victory?

The Inuit town of Clyde River has won a long battle to stop Arctic seismic testing. The Supreme Court ruled the Inuit weren't adequately consulted. What does that mean for future consultations?
The relationship between Canada’s Aboriginal peoples and non-indigenous population has never been an equal one. AAP Image/Adam Gartrell

Canada’s progress shows indigenous reconciliation is a long-term process

The relationship between Canada's Aboriginal peoples and non-indigenous population has never been an equal one, even though the 1982 national constitution recognises Aboriginal rights.
Inuit women carrying their kids in traditional hooded parkas. Indigenous midwifery programs have expanded across Canada and are linked to excellent health outcomes. Spencer/Flickr

Birthing on Country could deliver healthier babies and communities

Tony Abbott spent most of this week in North East Arnhem Land, part of his long-held hope “to be not just the Prime Minister but the Prime Minister for Aboriginal Affairs”. In the final of our Abbott in…
HMS Terror thrown up by the ice. Engraving after a drawing by Captain George Back, from his 1836-37 Arctic expedition. Captain George Back/Wikimedia Commons , PD-UK

Inuit folklore kept alive story of missing Franklin expedition to north-west passage

On September 6, Canada’s prime minister, Stephen Harper, announced that one of the fabled lost ships of Sir John Franklin’s expedition had been found off Hat Island, south-west of King William Island…

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