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Articles on Ocean warming

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Morgan Pratchett, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

The outlook for coral reefs remains grim unless we cut emissions fast — new research

A study of 183 coral reefs worldwide quantified the impacts of ocean warming and acidification on reef growth rates. Even under the lowest emissions scenarios, the future of reefs is not bright.
Climate change could further stress species such as Atlantic cod that already are threatened by overfishing. Vladimir Wrangel/Shutterstock

How is climate change affecting fishes? There are clues inside their ears

Tiny calcified formations inside fishes' ears can be used to trace a fish's life history – and potentially, how climate change has affected its growth and development.
Droplets rising from the Champagne vent on the ocean floor in the Mariana Islands. Fluids venting from the site contain dissolved carbon dioxide. NOAA Ocean Explorer

Deep sea carbon reservoirs once superheated the Earth – could it happen again?

Thousands of years ago, carbon gases trapped on the seafloor escaped, causing drastic warming that helped end the last ice age. A scientist says climate change could cause this process to repeat.
Flood waters cover large tracts of land in Mozambique after cyclone Idai made landfall. Rapidly rising floodwaters have cut off thousands of families from aid organizations. (World Food Programme via AP)

Hurricanes to deliver a bigger punch to coasts

Climate change is making hurricanes more destructive, and may have boosted the intensity of cyclone Idai that hit Mozambique, Zambia and Malawi.
This summer, coastal seas to the north and east of New Zealand are even warmer than during last year’s marine heat wave. from www.shutterstock.com

Coastal seas around New Zealand are heading into a marine heatwave, again

Marine heatwaves may become the new normal for the Tasman Sea and the ocean around New Zealand, and oceanographers are developing models to better predict their intensity.
Cairns has lots of hard grey infrastructure but much less green infrastructure that would reduce the impacts of the city’s growth. Karine Dupré

Cities can grow without wrecking reefs and oceans. Here’s how

Urbanisation is the main reason for rising temperatures and water pollution, but receives little attention in discussions about the health of water streams, reefs and oceans.
Many Caribbean reefs are now dominated by sponges. from www.shutterstock.com

The rise of sponges in Anthropocene reef ecosystems

Marine sponges are ancient organisms that have survived mass extinctions. Many are more tolerant of climate change and may dominate over corals in future reef systems.

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