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Articles on Open science

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After great popularity, the idea of power poses came under fire. Choreograph/iStock via Getty Images Plus

The idea that power poses boost your confidence fell from favor – but a new review of the research calls for a second look

For a while it was all the rage to adopt Wonder Woman’s famous stance and other body positions that allegedly pumped up your confidence – until more studies of the phenomenon failed to find the connection.
In order to get funding from the National Institutes of Health, researchers now need a plan for sharing and managing their data. Exdez/Digital Vision Vectors via Getty Images

New data-sharing requirements from the National Institutes of Health are a big step toward more open science – and potentially higher-quality research

Starting in 2023, all research proposals funded by the NIH will need to include a data sharing and management plan. An expert on open science explains the requirements and how they might improve science.
Modern computing allows to spot isolated trees and shrubs in semi-arid areas, facilitating research on the evolution of vegetation cover. Martin Brandt

How we mapped billions of trees in West Africa using satellites, supercomputers and AI

Advanced techniques allowed our research team to build an open database of billions of individual trees and challenge some common perceptions about vegetation in arid and semi-arid zones.
India’s plan indicates that commercial publishers are winning over the application of the open access system to make scholarly literature available for everyone. Dasapta Erwin Irawan

India’s plan to pay journal subscription fees for all its citizen may end up making science harder to access

All modern scientists should share ownership of their knowledge and research.
Through public genome sequences, a team in Berlin perfected a molecular diagnostic protocol to detect the 2019-nCoV more than a week before the first case was confirmed in Germany. Shutterstock

Open science promotes global scientific collaboration to tackle coronavirus: why hasn’t Indonesia contributed?

Frontier research initiatives to tackle the 2019 coronavirus seem to be dominated by institutions in China, the US, Japan and labs across Europe. Very little seem to be coming form Indonesia.
20 years ago, who could predict how much more researchers would know today about the human past – let alone what they could learn from a thimble of dirt, a scrape of dental plaque, or satellites in space. Manuel Domínguez-Rodrigo

Archaeological discoveries are happening faster than ever before, helping refine the human story

20 years ago, who could predict how much more researchers would know today about the human past – let alone what they could learn from a thimble of dirt, a scrape of dental plaque, or satellites in space.
Around 90% of research papers published in journals contain results that prove the hypotheses. This bias has driven scientists to commit unethical practices just to get published easier. Shutterstock

Three things the scientific community can do to filter sketchy research

Indonesia’s unhealthy obsession with research output is driving scientists to commit unethical acts to produce research that are more publishable. What can the research community do to stop this?
Books such as Ayelet Waldman’s A Really Good Day and Michael Pollan’s How to Change Your Mind have drawn popular attention to the practise of ‘microdosing’ psychedelics. (Shutterstock)

‘Microdosers’ of LSD and magic mushrooms are wiser and more creative

According to new research, individuals who take small regular doses of psychedelics such as LSD and psilocybin mushrooms score higher on mental health, well-being and creativity.
There is a growing research literature suggesting psychedelics hold incredible promise for treating mental health ailments ranging from depression and anxiety to PTSD. (Shutterstock)

Opening up the future of psychedelic science

To know the real promise of psychedelic substances like LSD, mushrooms and MDMA, researchers must embrace the principles and practise of ‘open science.’

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